Former President Bill Clinton slammed President Trump saying, "if you want a president who defines the job as spending hours a day watching TV and zapping people on social media, he's your man," during Tuesday night's Democratic National Convention.

What he's saying: "Denying, distracting and demeaning works great if you're trying to entertain or inflame. In a real crisis, it collapses like a house of cards. COVID doesn't respond to any of that. To beat it, you have to actually go to work and deal with the facts."

  • "You know what Donald Trump will do with four more years: blame, bully and belittle. And you know what Joe Biden will do: build back better. It's Trump's 'us vs. them America' against Joe Biden's America."

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
Sep 22, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Bill Stepien: Trump travel, grassroots campaigning worth $48 million a week

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A stark difference between the Trump and Biden campaigns is Trump-Pence's aggressive continuation of traditional door-knocking amid the pandemic, while Joe Biden emphasizes virtual techniques. And President Trump travels more.

The state of play: Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien is now quantifying the difference, arguing in a new memo that candidate travel and the campaign's ground game give the president an advantage at a time when the airwaves are saturated.

Biden campaign plans travel around competitive Senate races

Joe Biden elbow-bumping a worker during a campaign stop in Wisconsin. Photo: JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign is storming states with competitive Senate races this week to help boost Democratic candidates in the run-up to the election.

Why it matters: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death is galvanizing Democrats to fight harder for control of the Senate with less than two months before Election Day.

TikTok's content-moderation time bomb

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

When the dust finally clears from the fight over TikTok, whoever winds up running the burgeoning short-video-sharing service is likely to face a world of trouble trying to manage speech on it.

Why it matters: Facebook’s story already shows us how much can go wrong when online platforms beloved by passionate young users turn into public squares.

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