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Data: Axios research. Table: Sara Wise/Axios

Two sets of data for 2020 show Big Tech's split-screen reality of cascading investigations on one side and surging valuations on the other.

Why it matters: Technology companies have never been under more regulatory scrutiny. But it so far hasn't impacted their growth or spooked investors.

Driving the news: Regulators across the country launched five new investigations last month into some of the most high-profile tech giants in the world.

  • The FTC, the Justice Department, Congress and nearly every state attorney general have dived into the business practices of Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon.
  • CEOs, once elusive and hard to wrangle to Capitol Hill, have made multiple (remote) appearances in 2020, defending their businesses and describing themselves as American success stories.

Meanwhile, Amazon, Google and Facebook's stocks are trading at near-record highs.

  • The Google and Facebook share prices are each up roughly 30% since last January. Amazon's stock is up more than 70%.
  • Investors have rewarded all three companies for high-growth moves during the pandemic, including e-commerce and gaming.
Expand chart
Data: Yahoo! Finance; Chart: Axios Visuals

The bottom line: The dichotomy shows how little regulatory attention matters to Wall Street investors.

Go deeper

Jan 21, 2021 - Technology

Tech companies worry about becoming targets

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Tech employees are on high alert about their own personal safety as their employers roll out policies to ban or limit the reach of far-right extremists angry over former President Donald Trump's defeat.

Why it matters: As tech companies impose aggressive policies after the Capitol riot, employees will be the target of vitriol from aggrieved people who think tech and the media are conspiring to silence Trump and conservatives more broadly.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
38 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.