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Harvard University campus. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Google, Facebook, Microsoft and other tech companies are joining the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to push back on the Trump administration's bid to bar foreign students from staying in the U.S. if their colleges are only offering online classes in the fall.

Why it matters: Big Tech and big U.S. business at large rely on attracting top minds from around the world. The companies argue that American education and economic health would suffer if international students are forced out.

Driving the news: The Chamber of Commerce is leading a brief in federal court, filed Monday morning, in support of Harvard and MIT, which sued the Department of Homeland Security last week.

  • Salesforce and Spotify are among the other companies on the amicus brief, which asks a federal judge in Boston to force the administration to halt or slow the enforcement of guidance from Immigration and Customs Enforcement that would bar people in the U.S. on student visas from taking a full course load online.

What they’re saying: "These students contribute substantially to the U.S. economy when they are resident in the United States," the parties say in the brief, stating that they will be harmed if the administration’s directive goes into effect.

  • They contend the administration didn't perform the proper analysis required under the Administrative Procedure Act in issuing its guidance, "failing to consider the consequences of their decision for the U.S. business community and the business community’s very substantial reliance interests."

Correction: Due to an editing error, this story mischaracterized the request being made in the brief. The parties want the judge to block or slow ICE’s enforcement of the rule, not block ICE from slowing its enforcement. The story has been corrected.

Go deeper

Oct 19, 2020 - Technology

Why education technology can’t save remote learning

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The coronavirus-sparked shift to widespread remote work has been generally smooth because most modern offices were already using a raft of communication, collaboration and administrative tools. Remote learning has faced a much rougher transition.

Why it matters: Even the best technology can't eliminate the inherent problems of virtual schooling. Several key technological stumbling blocks have persisted in keeping remote learning from meeting its full potential, experts tell Axios.

Trump's coronavirus adviser Scott Atlas resigns

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty

Scott Atlas, a controversial member of the White House coronavirus task force, handed in his resignation on Monday, according to three administration officials who discussed Atlas' resignation with Axios.

Why it matters: President Trump brought in Atlas as a counterpoint to NIAID director Anthony Fauci, whose warnings about the pandemic were dismissed by the Trump administration. With Trump now fixated on election fraud conspiracy theories, Atlas' detail comes to a natural end.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Assassination in Iran sets stage for tense final 50 days of Trump

The funeral ceremony in Tehran. Photo: Iranian Defense Ministry via Getty

Iranian leaders are weighing their response to the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, known as the father of Iran’s military nuclear program, who was given a state funeral Monday in Tehran.

The big picture: Iran has accused Israel of carrying out Friday’s attack, but senior leaders have suggested that they’ll choose patience over an immediate escalation that could play into the hands of the Israelis and the outgoing Trump administration.