Photo: Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images

U.S. workers are quitting their jobs again, a sign of confidence in the economy and a very good reason to feel optimistic on Independence Day.

The big picture: 2018 is the first year on record that the U.S. has more available jobs than people looking for jobs. And at the same time, "workers are choosing to leave their jobs at the fastest rate since the internet boom 17 years ago," the WSJ's David Harrison and Eric Morath report.

  • "3.4 million Americans quit their jobs in April, near a 2001 peak and twice the 1.7 million who were laid off from jobs in April."
  • "Job-hopping is happening across industries including retail, food service and construction, a sign of broad-based labor-market dynamism."

Why it matters: "Job-switchers saw roughly 30% larger annual pay increases in May than those who stayed put over the past 12 months..."

Be smart: We're still expecting major job losses from automation, without a solid answer for what we'll do about it.

  • As Axios' Steve LeVine noted earlier this year, "Congress and the Trump administration have yet to create a coherent policy response... including the potential for decades of flat wages and joblessness. But cities and regions are starting to act on their own."

Go deeper

Biden and Trump point fingers over "buy American" proposals

Joe Biden at a campaign event in Wilmington, DE. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump and Joe Biden are going back and forth over the former vice president's "buy American" economic proposal, which Trump claims Biden "plagiarized" from him.

Why it matters: Biden is directly challenging Trump and his "America First" agenda with the release of his latest plan, focused on economic recovery and re-investing in American manufacturing in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

2 hours ago - Technology

Amazon tells workers to delete TikTok from devices they use for work

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Amazon, citing security risks, told its employees Friday to uninstall social video app TikTok from any mobile devices they use to access their work email.

Why it matters: The move comes amid a broader backlash against TikTok, in part due to questions around possible ties to Beijing. TikTok is owned by Chinese tech firm ByteDance.

Delta CEO: Trump administration should issue mask mandate for air travel

Photo: Al Seib/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Delta CEO Ed Bastian on Friday told CNN that he believes the Trump administration should move to require the use of face masks during air travel amid a surge in coronavirus cases.

The big picture: Delta already requires passengers to wear masks during its flights, but Bastian says it can be difficult to enforce that directive if passengers refuse — and he's not sure if other airlines would be on board.