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Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Miguel Cardona, education commissioner in Connecticut, has accepted President-elect Joe Biden's offer to serve as secretary of the Department of Education, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: Cardona will be responsible for leading a reopening of the country's schools, which Biden has pledged to do within his first 100 days as president if Congress helps with financial support.

The big picture: The safe reopening of schools during the pandemic is an urgent issue as parents and educators fear losing a generation of scholars due to coronavirus shutdowns that sent children to remote learning.

  • There have been broad inequities in this digital environment, spurring a movement to get kids back in classrooms and to secure the health of teachers who must stand before them.
  • "In-person education is too important for our children to disrupt their education further, unless and until local conditions specifically dictate the need to do so,” Cardona and the acting public health commissioner wrote to school superintendents last month, according to the Hartford Courant.

Zoom in: In addition to reopening schools, the next education secretary will face calls to take administrative action to cancel $1.7 trillion in student debt, a key priority for the progressive wing of the Democratic Party.

  • During the campaign, Biden supported legislation to forgive borrowers' first $10,000 in student loans. He has been noncommittal about canceling student debt by administrative fiat, a move pushed by the left.
  • Democrats also feel a great sense of urgency to repeal educational changes made by President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, both in K-12 and Title IX regulations on sexual assault cases.

Flashback: Biden promised during the campaign he would select a “teacher” to replace DeVos.

  • Cardona, who grew up in public housing, began his career as an elementary school teacher, according to the Hartford Courant.

Between the lines: After initially supporting the NEA's Garcia for the job, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus is now also backing Cardona, noting he started school speaking only Spanish.

  • “Mr. Cardona fully grasps the challenges that English as Second Language (ESL) Learners, Latinos and other minority students face in America’s classrooms,” CHC members wrote in a letter to Biden.

The bottom line: Cardona would be the third Hispanic nominated to Biden’s Cabinet, after the president-elect named Alejandro Mayorkas to run Homeland Security and Xavier Becerra to lead the Department of Health and Human Services.

Go deeper

Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategy

Biden signs executive orders on Jan. 21. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

"It's gonna get worse before it gets better": President Biden expects 100,000 Americans to die from COVID-19 during his first six weeks in office.

The big picture: Biden said he's putting America on a wartime footing against the virus, signing 10 executive orders today alone.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.