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Artists paint portraits of President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris in Mumbai, India. Photo: Anshuman Poyrekar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

President Biden plans to meet this month with the leaders of Japan, Australia and India in a virtual summit of the so-called Quad, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: By putting a Quad meeting on the president’s schedule, the White House is signaling the importance of partnerships and alliances to counter China’s growing influence in the Indo-Pacific region.

  • Biden has spoken with each leader individually, but putting them together gives an early boost to the burgeoning group, which some have suggested could grow into an Asian version of NATO.
  • Last month, Secretary of State Antony Blinken joined a virtual summit of Quad foreign ministers.
  • They offered a veiled criticism of China by pledging “to strongly oppose unilateral and forceful attempts to change the status quo in the context of the East and South China Sea.”
  • The White House declined to confirm the upcoming meeting.

The big picture: The Quad, a security dialogue among four of the region’s biggest democracies, was first established in 2007. It quickly lost its luster, in part because Australia and India were reluctant to take any action that might antagonize China.

  • The Trump administration embraced the Quad concept, as the four countries grew more comfortable coordinating their security postures and more concerned about China’s rise.
  • One month before the 2020 election, then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo flew to a summit in South Korea to rail against China’s “exploitation, corruption and coercion.”

Between the lines: President Obama implemented the "Pivot to Asia," complementing the United States' traditional focus on European alliances with new ones in the Pacific region.

  • President Trump abandoned his predecessor's Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal but embraced the Quad.
  • Now, Biden is carrying on. After he spoke with India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in February, the White House said the leaders would work toward “a stronger regional architecture through the Quad.”

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
Mar 4, 2021 - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

Expand chart

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
50 mins ago - Technology

Meet your doctor's AI assistant

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Artificial intelligence is breaking into the doctor's office, with new models that can transcribe, analyze and even offer predictions based on written notes and conversations between physicians and their patients.

Why it matters: AI models can increasingly be trained on what we tell our doctors, now that they're starting to understand our written notes and even our conversations. That will open up new possibilities for care — and new concerns about privacy.

What we know about the victims of the Indianapolis mass shooting

Officials load a body into a vehicle at the site of the mass shooting in Indianapolis. Photo:

Eight people who were killed along with several others who were injured in a Thursday evening shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis have been identified by local law enforcement.

The big picture: The Sikh Coalition said at least four of the eight victims were members of the Indianapolis Sikh community.

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