Oct 23, 2019

The best cities for America's freelancers

Data: Neighborhoods.com; Chart: Axios Visuals

Spokane, Washington, is the best city for freelancers with a relatively low cost of rent and adequate internet service, according to a new study from Neighborhoods.com

Why it matters: The 56.7 million Americans who work as freelancers often don't work in a traditional office setting, so being in a city that has sufficient internet service and is easy to navigate is important. American freelancers contribute about $1 trillion to the economy, per the Freelancers Union.

The study: Neighborhoods.com ranked 150 cities based on median rent, average internet speed, number of coffee shops per capita, income tax and ease of getting around using U.S. Census Bureau data.

  • The study defined a freelancer as "anyone who is employed on a contract basis rather than being a permanent full-time employee for one company."

The worst cities for freelancers:

  1. Lexington, Kentucky
  2. Palmdale, California
  3. Port St. Lucie, Florida
  4. Jackson, Mississippi
  5. Memphis, Tennessee
  6. Corona, California
  7. Oceanside, California
  8. Worcester, Massachusetts
  9. Santa Clarita, California
  10. Lincoln, Nebraska

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Photo: Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Microsoft said in a blog post Monday that it will apply the protections of a new California privacy law for all users in the U.S. The California Consumer Privacy Act was passed last year, but goes into effect Jan. 1.

Why it matters: The law allows consumers to require companies to disclose what data they are keeping on a consumer, and gives consumers the right to have such data be deleted. Also, starting next July, Californians will be allowed to sue businesses for certain data breaches.

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California, other states sue EPA for right to set higher emissions standards

Photo: George Rose/Getty Images

Twenty-three states joined California in suing the Environmental Protection Agency for stripping away an Obama-era waiver that allows the state to set strict emissions standards on cars and trucks, the California's attorney general's office announced Friday.

The big picture: This is the latest in a high-stakes battle between California and the Trump administration over the fuel-efficiency of cars in America, says Axios' Amy Harder. Automakers — and drivers — are caught in the middle and likely stuck with significant uncertainty for years as these legal and regulatory fights wear on.

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California won't buy from automakers who side with Trump on emissions

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California confirmed Monday that it won't buy new government vehicles from automakers who backed President Trump in his carbon emissions war with the state, the New York Times reports. GM, Fiat Chrysler and Toyota are among those set to be affected by the move.

Driving the news: The three big automakers and others announced in October that they were joining the Trump administration's side in litigation over its move to stop California from imposing emissions rules and, by proxy, mileage requirements that are tougher than federal standards, per Axios' Ben Geman.

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