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Photo: Harry Langer/DeFodi Images via Getty Images

Bayern Munich and Hoffenheim refused to play the final 10 minutes of their match on Saturday in protest of derogatory signs directed at Hoffenheim's billionaire owner Dietmar Hopp.

The backdrop: Hopp, who co-founded German software giant SAP and played for Hoffenheim's youth team, has pumped gobs of money into the club since taking over in 2000, fueling its rise from the fifth division to the Bundesliga.

Between the lines: "While that kind of spending is much more commonplace in American sports, it is frowned upon in Germany, which has a rule written specifically to protect against it," writes Yahoo Sports' Joey Gulino.

  • Hopp was granted an exception by the Bundesliga, and while other clubs also have exceptions, fans consider Hoffenheim the most "inauthentic and symptomatic of everything wrong with modern soccer," adds Gulino.
  • This weekend was not the first time Hopp has been targeted by opposing fans, and similar protests have been levied against RB Leipzig owners Red Bull, who are accused of using the club as a marketing ploy for their energy drink empire.

The big picture: This story serves as a great reminder of how much sports culture differs globally. As leagues like the NBA continue to expand, it's worth remembering that while the language of sports is universal, sports fandom — and the role that money plays in sports — is not the same from country to country.

"I understand this can be a hard thing to process for a lot of people in [England] because the culture is so different. I think what Hopp has done is to our mind not wrong at all. ... German fans see it as unnatural that a wealthy individual makes a club bigger and better than it should be. That's just part of the German football culture."
Soccer writer Lars Sivertsen, via BT Sport

What to watch: If players are willing to make a statement like this in support of a billionaire owner, hopefully they'll start to do the same for their black teammates who continue to be targeted by racist abuse.

Go deeper: The world's wealthiest soccer clubs

Go deeper

17 mins ago - Health

CDC panel: COVID vaccines should go to health workers, long-term care residents first

Hospital staff work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura via Getty

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line to get coronavirus vaccines in the United States once they’re cleared and available for public use, an independent CDC panel recommended in a 13-1 emergency vote on Tuesday, per CNBC.

Why it matters: Recent developments in COVID-19 vaccines have accelerated the timeline for distribution as vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna undergo the federal approval process. States are preparing to begin distributing as soon as two weeks from now.

Obama: Broad slogans like "defund the police" lose people

Snapchat.

Former President Barack Obama told Peter Hamby on the Snapchat original political show "Good Luck America" that "snappy" slogans such as "defund the police" can alienate people, making the statements less effective than intended.

What he's saying: "You lost a big audience the minute you say it, which makes it a lot less likely that you're actually going to get the changes you want done," Obama told Hamby in an interview that will air Wednesday morning at 6 a.m. EST on Snapchat.

Nasdaq's ultimatum

Photo: Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images

New diversity and inclusion rules are on the table for some of America's most powerful corporations, courtesy of one of its most powerful stock exchanges.

What's new: Nasdaq is threatening to delist companies that won't move toward having at least one woman and at least one underrepresented minority or LGBTQ person on their corporate boards.