Jul 30, 2019

Barr moves to restrict asylum claims based on threats to family members

Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr issued an opinion Monday that moves to restrict asylum protections for migrants whose family members have been persecuted in their home countries.

Why it matters: This precedent-setting decision is another attempt by the Trump administration to limit U.S. sanctuary options for asylum-seekers.

Aaron Reichlin-Melnick of the American Immigration Council

The big picture: The decision reverses a 2018 ruling by the Justice Department’s Board of Immigration Appeals that a Mexican migrant whose father was targeted by a drug cartel could be eligible for asylum, per the New York Times.

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Court ruling allows Trump asylum restrictions in Texas and New Mexico

An art exhibiton next to a section of the U.S.-Mexico border fence. Photo: Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Friday that an earlier injunction on the Trump administration's third-country asylum rule, which barred migrants from asylum in the U.S. if they did not first apply for protection in a country they travelled through, can only be applied within the Ninth Circuit.

Why it matters: The Ninth Circuit is located along the West Coast and includes the U.S.-Mexico border states of California and Arizona. That means that this decision will effectively block — at least for now — most Central Americans who cross into the U.S., legally or illegally, in New Mexico or Texas from asylum.

Go deeperArrowAug 16, 2019

Trump rule would indefinitely detain migrant kids with their parents

A migrant family jumps the wall to reach the U.S. Photo: David Peinado/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Trump administration announced a new rule on Wednesday that would allow migrant families who crossed the border illegally to be kept in detention centers long-term.

Why it matters: A decades-old court decision — the Flores agreement — has prevented the government from holding minors in detention for longer than 20 days. The new regulation would replace that and give the federal government more power in determining how to care for migrant minors and families in its custody. The rule was first proposed following the family separation crisis last year, and is certain to face legal challenges.

Go deeperArrowAug 21, 2019

19 states and D.C. sue Trump administration over family detention rule

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Image

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, along with 18 other states and the District of Columbia, are suing the Trump administration over a new rule allowing migrant families to be kept in detention long-term, Becerra's spokesperson confirmed Monday.

Why it matters: This is the California attorney general's 13th immigration-related lawsuit against the Trump administration, the spokesperson told Axios. The case will ultimately be brought in front of California federal Judge Dolly Gee, who has already refused to grant President Trump's request to change the decades-old Flores settlement to allow families to be detained together longer than 20 days.

Go deeper: Trump rule would indefinitely detain migrant kids with their parents

Keep ReadingArrowAug 26, 2019