Andrew Harnik / AP

After weeks of "nonstop fighting," Stephen Bannon, an outspoken nationalist, called Jared Kushner a "cuck" and a "globalist" behind his back, according to several Trump officials who talked to The Daily Beast. Bannon accused Kushner of trying to push him out of the White House, one official said.

"[Steve] recently vented to us about Jared being a 'globalist' and a 'cuck'…He actually said 'cuck,' as in "cuckservative. - an administration official to The Daily Beast.

A brief history on the term cuck: The term "cuck" is short for a much older term used often by Shakespeare — "cuckold," which literally refers to a man whose spouse is unfaithful.

Origins: The word was derived from the cuckoo bird, whose females lay their eggs in different nests.

Racial insinuation: In pornography, the cuckold was most often a white man whose white wife cheated on him with a black man, according to GQ.

Political use: During the 2016 election season, the term became a favorite of the alt-right to describe mainstream Republicans who did not support Donald Trump — "cuckservatives" — whom they saw as weak.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Competition in the hard seltzer market is heating up in the closing weeks of summer, as big companies like Constellation Brands, AB InBev and Molson Coors have entered the market and Coca-Cola is poised to join the fray in 2021.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has increased alcohol sales overall and hard seltzers are exploding in popularity and look to have staying power, boasting record high sales in recent weeks.

Why you should be skeptical of Russia's coronavirus vaccine claims

Photo: Alexey Druzhini/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin announced Tuesday that his country has registered a coronavirus vaccine and said that one of his daughters has already been inoculated, AP reports.

Why it matters: Scientists around the world are skeptical about Russia's claims. There is no published scientific data to back up Putin's claims that Russia has a viable vaccine — or that it produces any sort of immunity without significant side effects.

A quandary for state unemployment agencies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

State agencies charged with paying unemployment benefits to jobless residents have their backs against the wall as they rush to parse President Trump's executive actions on coronavirus aid.

Why it matters: States are being asked to pitch in $100 per unemployed resident, but it’s a heavy lift for cash-strapped states that are still unclear about the details and may not opt-in at all. It leaves the states and jobless residents in a state of limbo.