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Data: Back-to-School National Educator Survey / Teachers Pay Teachers. Chart: Axios Visuals

Back-to-school plans have teachers and parents on edge — but for different reasons, according to two surveys out this morning.

Why it matters: Parents and teachers have proven to be powerful forces in influencing local back-to-school plans, but many feel conflicted about their local districts' fall plans and others feel unprepared to tackle all-virtual or hybrid learning.

Parents' top concern is their child getting COVID-19 (66%), followed by their child being a carrier of the virus and spreading it to someone else (51%), and children not social distancing (49%), according to a Care.com survey of 2,019 parents.

  • 74% of parents say they're not satisfied by or don't know what their local government's back-to-school plan is.
  • Only 17% of parents feel prepared for virtual learning or homeschooling.
  • 65% of parents expect to need more childcare than they currently have in the fall.

Meanwhile: When asked what would make them most comfortable, top responses were to continue virtual or homeschooling until a vaccine is available (21%) or until there are significantly fewer cases in their state (20%), and a staggered virtual and in-person school schedule (20%).

A majority of teachers (52%) are worried about implementing the instructional models they've been directed to prepare for the fall, whether it be in-person classes, remote instruction or hybrid models, according to a survey of 1,101 PreK-12 teachers by Teachers Pay Teachers.

  • 93% of educators are worried about providing equitable instruction to all students.
  • 82% predict a lack of internet access for students will be at least somewhat of a barrier, while 79% say the inability to communicate with students and families will be a barrier.
  • 71% are taking courses to learn more about remote instruction or are brushing up on tech tools for the fall.

Between the lines: In the Washington, D.C. area, local school district surveys have shown diverging preferences between parents and teachers — with more parents hoping children will physically go back to school due to child care and academic concerns, and more teachers preferring virtual classes to prevent the virus' spread.

  • These surveys indicate more overlap in their worries: Parents are also acutely worried about children's health risk and teachers are highly concerned about being able to deliver a quality educational experience virtually.

Separately, a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of available data showed that while COVID-19 illness is significantly less severe in children, some do get very sick in rare instances.

  • And while children do transmit the virus to others, more evidence is needed to determine the frequency and extent of the transmission, per the brief.

Go deeper: Reopening schools is a lose-lose dilemma for many families of color

Go deeper

Biden pledges effort to reunite separated immigrant children with their families

In a new ad, Joe Biden pledges to sign an executive order to form a task force dedicated to finding the parents of 545 children separated from their families at the southern border.

Why it matters: The Biden campaign is focusing on Latino voters just days before the election. The campaign had previously launched an ad focused on the family separations at the border called "Números."

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
18 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.