Beijing's new national security law doesn't just apply to Hong Kong residents. Its Article 38 makes it illegal for anyone in the world to promote democratic reform for Hong Kong — including you.

  • Plus, how Wall Street is now betting on a Joe Biden presidency.
  • And, new Immigration and Customs Enforcement rules won't let international students attend online-only classes as some schools start making plans for the fall.

Guests: Axios' Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian, Dion Rabouin, and Mike Allen

Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Carol Alderman, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Naomi Shavin and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. We can be contacted by email at podcasts@axios.com.

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6 hours ago - Podcasts

The dangerous tech of nuclear war

On this day 75 years ago, the U.S. dropped a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima. Since the end of the Cold War, the threat of a nuclear attack has seemed farfetched. However, the rise of cyberattacks and artificial intelligence could disrupt the precarious balance between nations in the modern nuclear arms race.

The new buyout barons

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Last month I wrote that SPACs are the new IPOs. But I may have understated it, because SPACs are also becoming the new private equity.

By the numbers: Short for "special purpose acquisition company," SPACs have raised $24 billion so far in 2020, with a loaded pipeline of upcoming offerings. U.S. buyout firms raised nearly $102 billion through the end of June — a much larger amount, but not so much larger that the two can't play on the same field.

3 hours ago - World

Macron visits Beirut promising a "new political pact" for Lebanon

Macron visits the hard-hit Gemmayzeh neighborhood. Photo: AFP via Getty Images

French President Emmanuel Macron walked through the blast-damaged streets of Beirut on Thursday, swarmed by people chanting for the fall of Lebanon's government and pleading for international aid.

Why it matters: Lebanon is at a breaking point. Its economy was collapsing and its government hardly functioning — all before a massive explosion destroyed swathes of the capital city, including its vital port.