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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) said in an interview with "Axios on HBO" Monday that she "can’t for the life of me understand" President Trump's antagonistic attitude toward her state, pointing out that he won it by more than 10,000 votes in the 2016 election.

The backdrop: Trump threatened to "hold up" unspecified federal funding to Michigan last week because the state government rolled out plans to expand voting-by-mail options amid the coronavirus pandemic. He's also repeatedly tweeted about Whitmer directly, claiming she's "way in over her head" with the coronavirus and that she "doesn't have a clue."

What she's saying:

"Why this antagonistic position against this state is something I can't for the life of me understand. And I would ask that we drop that. I was thinking the other day about when Barack Obama went into New Jersey after the hurricane, and was greeted by Chris Christie. And they both stood there and said we're going to get through this, we're going to work together. That's how it should be. And that's what I would like it to be like, frankly. And that's what we should expect it to be. And that's not what it is, obviously."

Go deeper: Michigan governor won't apologize for coronavirus lockdown

Go deeper

Chaos scenarios drive gatekeepers' election prep

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Big Tech is holding dry runs to game out Election Day chaos scenarios, key participants tell Axios.

Axios has learned that Facebook, Google, Twitter and Reddit are holding regular meetings with one another, with federal law enforcement — and with intelligence agencies — to discuss potential threats to election integrity.

Updated Sep 3, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump suggests people in N.C. vote twice to test mail-in system

President Trump makes a speech at the U.S.S. Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington, N.C. Photo: Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

President Trump suggested during a visit to North Carolina that people should vote once by mail and again in person during the election.

What he's saying: "Let them send it in and let them go vote, and if their system's as good as they say it is, then obviously they won’t be able to vote," he said. "If it isn't tabulated, they'll be able to vote. And that’s what they should do."

Biden Cabinet confirmation schedule: When to watch hearings

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on Jan. 16 in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

The first hearings for President-elect Joe Biden's Cabinet nominations begin on Tuesday, with testimony from his picks to lead the departments of State, Homeland and Defense.

Why it matters: It's been a slow start for a process that usually takes place days or weeks earlier for incoming presidents. The first slate of nominees will appear on Tuesday before a Republican-controlled Senate, but that will change once the new Democratic senators-elect from Georgia are sworn in.