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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Data: Ipsos/Axios survey, margin of error of ±3.3 percentage points; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Seven in 10 people now consider going to the grocery store a risky act — and a majority of Americans say they've started wearing masks outside their homes at least sometimes — in the latest installment of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

The big picture: In Week 5 of our national poll, we're seeing in more detail just how people are adapting to common fears and changes about the "new normal."

There's more evidence that the virus is impacting society unevenly.

  • 57% of those still leaving the home to work as they normally would say they feel that doing their job is moderately or very risky, compared with 13% of those working from home.
  • African Americans (50%) and Hispanics (47%) are more likely than non-Hispanic whites (37%) to see their work as risky to their health or well-being.
  • People furloughed or laid off or whose employers closed were more likely to report rising household debt, domestic disagreements and watching more TV.
  • "Those who still work out in the world are particularly concerned about the risks they are running, and those laid off are reporting increasing debt and familial conflict," said Cliff Young, president of Ipsos U.S. Public Affairs.

Other top lines from the survey: Trust in the federal government and state government is sliding slowly as the pandemic wears on and infections and joblessness rises.

  • One in five Americans now know someone who's tested positive.
  • Four in five worry about the possibility of getting sick themselves, though only one in five is "extremely concerned."
  • 73% say airplane flights or taking mass transit poses large health risks.

The intrigue: The large majority that considers grocery shopping to be risky helps explain shifts toward more online and delivery services.

  • Just 28% said having food delivered to their homes poses a moderate or large risk, compared to 33% for picking up takeout.

Masks, more than gloves, are becoming part of Americans' daily uniform when they suit up to leave home.

  • 56% said they wear a mask occasionally, sometimes or all the time (30% said all the time), while only 37% said they ever wear gloves out.
  • Democrats (71%), older Americans (65%) and women (63%) were more likely to say they're wearing masks some or all of the time. That's higher than Republicans (50%), independents (49%), men (49%) and younger age groups.
  • Counterintuitively, people still working outside the home (46%) were less likely than those working remotely (60%) to say they were wearing masks.

Trust in the federal government to look out for people's best interests slid from 53% to 45% since Week 2, when we began asking the question.

  • Trust in state governments fell as well, from 71% to 65% since Week 2.
  • But trust in local government has held steady at 69% for the past three weeks, down slightly from a high of 71% in Week 2.
  • Meanwhile, respondents' already high trust in their employers has climbed steadily, from 68% to 79%.
  • And 84% said they have either a great deal or fair amount of trust in local health officials and health care workers.

Methodology: This Axios/Ipsos Poll was conducted April 10-13 by Ipsos' KnowledgePanel®. This poll is based on a nationally representative probability sample of 1,098 general population adults age 18 or older.

  • The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.3 percentage points at the 95% confidence level, for results based on the entire sample of adults.

Go deeper

Biden's two-step negotiating process

President Biden departs Geneva. Photo: Martial Trezzini/Pool/AFP via Getty

President Biden's summit "reset" was less about trying to make a friend out of Russia than reframing what the U.S. believes can be accomplished by engaging with President Vladimir Putin.

Driving the news: The Geneva meeting yielded no immediate breakthroughs beyond agreements about ambassadors returning to work and plans to launch talks on nuclear security. But in classic Biden fashion — aviators on, jacket off and a one-liner about invading Russia he had to clarify was a joke — the U.S. president used a post-summit news conference to explain his approach.

Scoop: NRCC to accept cryptocurrency donations

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Republicans' House campaign arm will begin accepting contributions in cryptocurrency, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The National Republican Congressional Committee is the first national party committee to solicit crypto donations. That puts it at the forefront of a disruptive financial technology that could test campaign finance rules.

By the numbers: Federal holiday adoption dates

Data: FederalPay; Chart: Connor Rothschild/Axios

In the 244-year history of the United States, the government has created 10 federal holidays. Juneteenth — to be marked on June 19 — will become No. 11.

Why it matters: It's not clear how all Americans will come to commemorate a day celebrating the formal end of slavery in the U.S., but it will come with all the trappings of the others: a day off for federal employees, and a potential close of businesses.

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