Stories by Scott Rosenberg

The end of shame

Illustration of a paper bag with a smiley face sticker over the head of a man in a suit
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Resigning in shame isn't really a thing anymore. Hanging on for dear life, and hoping everyone will forget about your scandal, is the new thing.

Why it matters: It's not just Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam. It's a growing group of elected officials who are still hanging around despite scandals that would have been considered fatal in the past. That's a sign of our shorter attention spans and the lightning speed of today's news cycles — but it's also a sign of how our standards have changed.

How Amazon's New York playbook backfired

Image of an Amazon crate and a City Hall balanced evenly on a fulcrum
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Amazon's retreat from Queens shows us the dynamics of a new local power game — one in which giant tech companies play on the same field with governments, as equals, with equal influence over our economies and communities.

The big picture: The company's move cheered those New Yorkers who believed the deal gave Amazon too much in the way of tax breaks and financial incentives, even as it disappointed local officials who'd banked on Amazon's promise of 25,000 new jobs.

Facebook's constitutional moment

Illustration of an old-fashioned etching of a legislator with a Facebook "like" thumbs up hand
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook critics, and outside experts have agreed on one thing over the past year: The social network of 2-billion-plus users is too big for one corporation to govern. Now Facebook is beginning to zero in on a detailed set of rules for a global mechanism to oversee who gets to say what on its platform.

The big picture: Last April, Zuckerberg first publicly floated the concept of a "Supreme Court"-like content moderation review board. In November, he committed to the project, and Facebook recently posted a "draft charter" for the body.

More stories loading.