Damian Dovarganes / AP

Chances are if you're a paralegal or a junior lawyer entering the field, you'd rather spend your time doing other things than scanning documents for clients' names or other mundane information. New artificial intelligence systems designed specifically for law firms can help remedy that situation by automating some of these lower-level jobs.

Why it matters: Although some entry-level paralegal jobs could be replaced by automation, AI systems cannot replicate the creativity, empathy, and argumentative reasoning required of a lawyer — so your lawyer won't be replaced by a robot any time soon. Furthermore, these AI advancements could open new, more fulfilling opportunities for aspiring lawyers to break into the field in a role that is more closely aligned to what they would do in the court room or when working with clients.

What's next: Deloitte predicts 116,000 legal jobs will be lost to automation in the next 20 years.

How it works: One law firm in the UK, Berwin Leighton Paisner (BLP), implemented an AI system to help with certain real estate cases. Ravn, a legal technology startup, created a system that analyzes the UK Land Registry title deeds to extract data and information in order to provide legal notices for the correct property owners in these disputes.

Why it works: This is something junior lawyers and paralegals would have done in the past, and it would have taken them weeks to pull this data. AI systems like Ravn's accomplish the same thing in minutes. Linklaters, another UK law firm, estimated it would take 12 minutes for a junior lawyer to search through 16 UK and European regulatory registers for clients' names and their banks; their AI system could comb through thousands of names in a few hours.

The goal: "We get AI to do a bunch of things cheaply, efficiently and accurately — which is most important," said Wendy Miller, partner and co-head of real estate disputes at BLP, per FT. "It leaves lawyers to do the interesting stuff."

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Why it matters: Hook had been tasked with executing Trump's "maximum pressure" policy toward Iran, working closely with Pompeo. That strategy has deepened tensions and thus far failed to force Iran back to the negotiating table, as Trump had hoped.

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Why it matters: The 73-year-old DeWine was set to meet President Trump Thursday on the tarmac at an airport in Cleveland and was tested as part of standard protocol. He is the second governor known to have contracted the coronavirus, after Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R).

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 18,860,908 — Total deaths: 708,676— Total recoveries — 11,394,821Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 4,834,546 — Total deaths: 158,445 — Total recoveries: 1,577,851 — Total tests: 58,920,975Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi rips GOP: "Perhaps you mistook them for somebody who gives a damn" — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tests positive.
  4. Public health: Fauci says task force will examine aerosolized spread.
  5. Business: July's jobs report could be an inflection point for the recovery — Teladoc and Livongo merge into virtual care giant.
  6. Sports: Where college football's biggest conferences stand on playing.