Jun 14, 2019

Apple's Tim Cook meets with Trump as tariffs loom

Ina Fried, author of Login

Apple CEO Tim Cook listens to President Trump at a 2017 White House meeting. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Apple CEO Tim Cook met with President Trump at the White House on Thursday.

Driving the news: It's not clear what was discussed, but it's hard to believe trade relations with China wasn't on the agenda — given the president's threat to impose an estimated $300 billion in tariffs on Chinese-made goods, including the iPhone.

  • Why it matters: Apple makes nearly all its iPhones in China, though supplier Foxconn said this week it has enough manufacturing capacity to make U.S.-bound iPhones outside China if it needs to. China is also a key market for Apple in terms of sales.

Context: Cook was in D.C. to attend a meeting of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, Trump and his daughter Ivanka told reporters.

Go deeper: Trump's newest tariff threat could raise iPhone, Nike shoe prices

Go deeper

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President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at their bilateral meeting at the G20 Osaka Summit 2019, in Osaka, Japan in 2019. Photo: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke on Monday about Trump's plans to expand September's G7 meeting in Washington to include Russia, according to the Russian government's readout of the call.

The big picture: The phone call between the two leaders, which the Kremlin says was initiated by Trump, comes amid six consecutive days of mass unrest in the U.S. over police brutality and racial inequality. The White House confirmed the call took place and said a readout was forthcoming.

Facebook employees stage "virtual walkout"

Screenshot of an image some Facebook employees are adding to their internal profiles, with or without the hashtag, to protest company policy.

"Dozens" of Facebook employees staged a "virtual walkout" Monday over the company's decision not to take action against President Trump's provocative messages in the face of nationwide protests against police violence, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: While Twitter added fact-check labels and hid the president's most inflammatory tweet — "when the looting starts, the shooting starts" — Facebook has said Trump's statements do not violate its policies, and that the platform aims to promote free speech.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Trump lashes out at governors, urges them to "dominate" protesters

President Trump berated the nation’s governors in a video teleconference call Monday, calling many of them "weak" and demanding tougher crackdowns on the protests that erupted throughout the country following the killing of George Floyd, according to multiple reports.

The big picture: Trump blamed violence on the "the radical left" and told the governors, who were joined by law enforcement and national security officials, that they have to "dominate" protesters and "arrest people" in order to bring an end to the unrest.