Photo: John Lamparski via Getty Images

Apple on Tuesday announced it's holding an Oct. 13 press event where it is expected to introduce several new iPhone models supporting 5G wireless networks.

Why it matters. The iPhone is Apple's biggest product. This year’s announcement is the latest it has ever debuted the new crop, following production delays as the coronavirus pandemic snarled supply chains in Asia earlier this year.

Details: The company is teasing the event with the tagline "Hi, Speed," likely a nod to the iPhone 12 series supporting ultra-fast 5G, as well as the general performance upgrades that come with each successive generation of iPhones.

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Ina Fried, author of Login
24 hours ago - Economy & Business

Apple-Google search deal faces antitrust spotlight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Google hands Apple billions of dollars annually to be the default search engine on the iPhone giant’s devices, an arrangement that’s coming under renewed scrutiny as part of the government's antitrust suit against Google.

Why it matters: Google is the go-to search engine on mobile devices due to this deal, together with other pacts with wireless carriers and Android device makers. Google says users would pick it anyway, but antitrust enforcers contend the deals give Google a huge advantage over its search rivals.

Apple lobbied Congress on bill targeting Uighur slave labor in China

A banner hung by protesters in a Hong Kong mall. The protesters demonstrated against alleged workers' rights violations at the factories that produce Apple products, September 2011. Photo: Felix Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

Apple paid an outside firm to lobby Congress on legislation targeting American companies working in areas in China that may use forced labor, The Information first reported. It remains unclear whether Apple lobbied against or for the bill.

Why it matters: Apple has faced scrutiny over the years regarding the human impact behind the manufacturing of its popular products.

Pre-bunking rises ahead of the 2020 election

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Tech platforms are no longer satisfied with debunking falsehoods — now they're starting to invest in efforts that preemptively show users accurate information to help them counter falsehoods later on.

Why it matters: Experts argue that pre-bunking can be a more effective strategy for combative misinformation than fact-checking. It's also a less polarizing way to address misinformation than trying to apply judgements to posts after they've been shared.