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A customer tries an iPhone 11 Pro Max. Photo by Li Muzi/Xinhua/Getty Images

For all the criticism that there isn't a whole lot new in this year's iPhones, Apple does seem to be scoring points for the areas it did focus on, namely the cameras and battery life. Add one more to the list of things it appears Apple got right: durability.

Why it matters: The price tag of high-end phones has climbed to $1,000 and up; even with insurance, a cracked screen can still be a costly slip-up.

  • Testing by Allstate-owned SquareTrade showed the iPhone 11 Pro to be particularly hearty, surviving the insurer's tumble test and doing pretty well in a test of water resistance. The iPhone 11 and Pro Max didn't fare quite as well as the smaller iPhone 11 Pro.

What they're saying: "After our robots dropped, dunked, tumbled and bent the devices, we found the new iPhone 11 Pro to be the most durable iPhone we've tested in generations," SquareTrade VP Jason Siciliano, vice president and global creative director at SquareTrade.

  • "It's the first smartphone to survive our tumble test, which simulates the effects of multiple, random impacts experienced by a smartphone during long-term use. That's a real achievement when it comes to durability," Siciliano said.

Yes, but: None of the new iPhones survived a drop on the sidewalk, whether dropped face-down or on their rear.

Be smart: Buy a case for that pricey phone. If you love its new color, buy a clear one.

Go deeper: Watch the video of the drops

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Fauci: COVID vaccine rollout needs to prioritize people of color

Anthony Fauci. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

Infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci highlighted the need to address racial disparities in the COVID-19 vaccination process, per an interview with The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday.

What he’s saying: "I think that's the one thing we really got to be careful of. We don't want in the beginning ... most of the people who are getting it are otherwise, well, middle-class white people."

The Mischief Makers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Several Republican and Democratic lawmakers are emerging as troublemakers within their parties and political thorns for their leadership.

Why it matters: We're calling this group "The Mischief Makers" — members who threaten to upend party unity — the theme eclipsing Washington at the moment — and potentially jeopardize the Democrats' or Republicans' position heading into the 2022 midterms.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Obama speechwriter fears Biden unity drive is one-sided

Cody Keenan (right) is shown heading to Marine One in December 2009. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Obama's former speechwriter says he's "preemptively frustrated" with President Biden's effort to find unity with Republicans.

What they're saying: Cody Keenan told Axios that Biden's messaging team has "struck all the right chords," but at some point "they're gonna have to answer questions like, 'Why didn't you achieve unity?' when there's an entire political party that's already acting to stop it."