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Photo: Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Apple is reportedly once again in talks with Intel to buy the company's troubled cellular modem business for around $1 billion.

Why it matters: Although Apple recently settled its legal dispute with Qualcomm, the company is widely believed to be interested in developing its own modem capabilities internally and has already hired people from both chipmakers, including at a new office in San Diego.

  • Such a transaction could give Apple access to both patents and the specialized workers needed to eventually design its own modem chips for the iPhone.
  • The Wall Street Journal reported on Monday that the talks are advanced and a deal could come this week.

Between the lines: Intel is in something of a bind. Apple is really the only big customer for standalone cellular modems, but its deal with Qualcomm likely means Intel's business will dry up.

  • That helps explain why, the day Apple and Qualcomm announced their settlement, Intel said it would cancel planned 5G modem chips and re-evaluate the business.

Our thought bubble: It's hard to imagine anyone other than Apple being interested in acquiring the business. The only other likely outcome — Intel shutting the unit — would have downsides for both companies.

  • Intel, of course, would get no return on its expensive investment. Apple could still hire people, but it would have to do so one by one, and it wouldn't get Intel's patents.

Go deeper: What Apple knows about you

Go deeper

Exclusive: Law enforcement organizations back Biden pick for assistant AG

Vanita Gupta Photo: Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Local and federal law enforcement officials are backing Vanita Gupta, President Biden’s nominee for associate attorney general, according to letters sent to the Senate Judiciary Committee and obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: The Major County Sheriffs of America noted Gupta “emphasized that she does not support efforts to ‘defund the police'” and highlighted her desire to improve criminal justice through methods that include increased training for law enforcement officials.

Updated 3 hours ago - World

U.S. releases report finding Saudi prince approved Khashoggi operation

Photo: Bandar Algaloud / Saudi Kingdom Council / Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) has released an unclassified report assessing that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) approved the operation to "capture or kill" Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi in 2018.

Driving the news: The White House also announced sanctions on entities implicated in the murder, though not on MBS directly. Officials also announced a new "Khashoggi ban" under which individuals accused of harassing journalists or dissidents outside their borders can be barred from entering the U.S.

About 20% of U.S. adults have received first vaccine dose, White House says

Joe Biden speaks during an event commemorating the 50 million COVID-19 vaccine shots. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

Nearly 1 in 5 adults and nearly half of Americans 65 and older have received their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine, White House senior adviser Andy Slavitt said on Friday.

The big picture: The Biden administration has previously said it has secured enough doses to vaccinate most of the American population by the end of July.