Ina Fried Jun 20
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Apple fires latest salvo in big patent fight with Qualcomm

Apple is updating its lawsuit against Qualcomm on Tuesday with even more vitriol, and several new legal claims too. The amended complaint, being filed today, adds dozens of new pages, but here are three of the biggest changes.

  1. Apple updated the suit to reflect the Supreme Court ruling in a case involving Lexmark. Apple alleges Qualcomm is seeking to be compensated twice for the same patents in selling chips and simultaneously seeking royalties for patents embodied in those chips, which Apple maintains runs contrary to the court's holdings in Lexmark.
  2. It asked the court to throw out Qualcomm's counterclaims that Apple has interfered with the company's contracts and harmed its ability to profit from its chip innovation.
  3. Apple detailed more of the Qualcomm patents it believes are at issue in the dispute and asked the court to declare them either invalid, not infringed by Apple, covered by the purchase of chips or all of the above.
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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 20 mins ago
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America's delayed backlash to globalization

Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping.
Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping. Photo: Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

The backlash to globalization is coming "at exactly the wrong time," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: President Trump's new tariffs, on steel and aluminum and most recently against China, are working to "re-set the terms of the global economy," the NYT reports. But the globalization the world is seeing today is not focused on goods and services, but "greater connectivity and communication."