Jul 9, 2019

Apple's updated MacBook Air costs less than its predecessor

The updated MacBook Air. Photo: Apple

Apple updated its MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro lines, offering lower prices on the former and including the small touchscreen TouchBar on the latter. It is also discontinuing its lightest model, the 12-inch MacBook.

Why it matters: The new models come ahead of the back-to-school season, a key time for new laptop purchases.

Details:

  • The new MacBook Air starts at $1,099 ($999 for college students) and includes TrueTone, which adjusts a screen's color for the lighting conditions.
  • The 13-inch MacBook Pro starts at $1,299 ($1,199 for students) and includes a faster Intel processor, Touch ID fingerprint sensor and the small TouchBar touchscreen that replaces the function keys.
  • Both laptops also have a redesigned keyboard, added to its other laptop models in May, that Apple says should could down substantially on issues where a pressed key would either not register, or register more than once.

Go deeper

Apple CEO: We want to continue making Mac Pro in the U.S.

Ina Fried/Axios

Apple CEO Tim Cook said Tuesday that the company is investing in U.S. manufacturing and hopes to continue to do final assembly of the Mac Pro here.

Why it matters: It was reported that Apple was asking for a tariff exemption related to the Mac Pro, but that was apparently so it could bring partially assembled goods into the U.S. for final assembly without tariffs. President Trump had tweeted in response that Apple should do its manufacturing here and wouldn't get any tariff relief.

Go deeperArrowJul 30, 2019

Apple in talks to buy Intel's $1 billion modem business

Photo: Alex Tai/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Apple is reportedly once again in talks with Intel to buy the company's troubled cellular modem business for around $1 billion.

Why it matters: Although Apple recently settled its legal dispute with Qualcomm, the company is widely believed to be interested in developing its own modem capabilities internally and has already hired people from both chipmakers, including at a new office in San Diego.

Go deeperArrowJul 23, 2019

Apple's growth areas rely on its shrinking iPhone business

Apple's new iPhone-powered credit card, Apple Card, launches next month. Photo: Apple

With its latest earnings numbers, Apple proved once again that its growing services and wearables businesses can help lead the company to record financial results even as iPhone sales fall short of prior years.

Why it matters: This strategy is a creative way to manage through a maturing smartphone market, but Apple's business is arguably just as dependent on the iPhone as it has ever been, perhaps more so, because these new businesses are tied at the hip to the device.

Go deeperArrowJul 31, 2019