Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Apple's financial chief said Thursday that this year's new iPhone models will arrive a few weeks later than they have in years past, confirming earlier news reports and supplier comments.

Why it matters: The move means some revenue that typically comes at the end of September won't come until the final quarter of the year, but also reassures investors and customers that the delay won't be longer.

In a conference call following blowout earnings, CFO Luca Maestri said that supply of the new iPhones will come "a few weeks later" than last year, when the new models went on sale in late September.

Qualcomm had said yesterday that its results would be impacted by a key customer having a delayed global launch for its 5G flagship, so it's fair to infer that at least some new iPhones will support 5G, as expected.

The big picture: Apple didn't give specific financial guidance for the current quarter but said it expects continued strength in its Mac and iPad businesses which saw stronger growth last quarter, amid the pandemic and a shift to distance learning.

"We believe we are going to have a strong back-to-school season," CEO Tim Cook said on the conference call.

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