Apr 27, 2019

Apple blocks popular apps that fight phone addiction

Photo: Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Images

Apple has removed or restricted features from at least 11 of the most downloaded screen-time tracking, phone-addiction fighting, and parental-control apps throughout 2019, according to a New York Times data analysis.

Why it matters: This report is an example of an increasingly common criticism of tech giants: They run the platform third parties rely on to reach consumers, but also own their own competing offerings.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Kim Hart: It won’t be lost on critics that Apple, which has come under fire for the addictive nature of its products, is reportedly making it difficult for addiction-fighting apps to survive on its platform.

More context, via Axios' Ina Fried: Apple has a history of limiting apps that handle tasks being done by Apple itself. That said, the world could benefit from multiple approaches to battling screen addiction.

The backdrop: Apple CEO Tim Cook told "Axios on HBO" that he used to pick up his iPhone too much, but has reduced his notifications: "The number of times I pick up a device are declining."

Go deeper: The growing war on tech addiction

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Updated 9 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Thousands of protesters march in Denver, Colorado, on May 30. Photo: Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the U.S. Saturday, amid tense standoffs with police in several cities.

The big picture: Floyd's fatal run-in with police is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

U.S. cities crack down on protests against police brutality

Photo: Megan Jelinger/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Trump to invite Russia and other non-member G7 countries to summit

President Trump at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Saul Martinez/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Saturday evening he would postpone the G7 summit to September and expand the meeting to more nations that are not members of the Group of 7.

Details: Trump said he would invite Russia, South Korea, Australia and India to the summit, according to a pool report. "I don’t feel that as a G7 it properly represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries," he said.