Photo: Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Images

Apple has removed or restricted features from at least 11 of the most downloaded screen-time tracking, phone-addiction fighting, and parental-control apps throughout 2019, according to a New York Times data analysis.

Why it matters: This report is an example of an increasingly common criticism of tech giants: They run the platform third parties rely on to reach consumers, but also own their own competing offerings.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Kim Hart: It won’t be lost on critics that Apple, which has come under fire for the addictive nature of its products, is reportedly making it difficult for addiction-fighting apps to survive on its platform.

More context, via Axios' Ina Fried: Apple has a history of limiting apps that handle tasks being done by Apple itself. That said, the world could benefit from multiple approaches to battling screen addiction.

The backdrop: Apple CEO Tim Cook told "Axios on HBO" that he used to pick up his iPhone too much, but has reduced his notifications: "The number of times I pick up a device are declining."

Go deeper: The growing war on tech addiction

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The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
6 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes. A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.