Apple admitted to slowing down old iPhones. Photo: Chesnot / Getty Images

In the wake of criticism over its handling of iPhone related battery issues, Apple announced a series of new actions, which include cutting the cost of replacing the battery on most newer iPhones to $29 from $79. Apple also issued an apology.

Why it matters: Apple faces multiple lawsuits over the issue, and has been under intense criticism for slowing down some older phones. While it had good reasons for doing so, making it hard and expensive to replace batteries added to the criticism.

Apple also said it will issue a software update early next year to "give users more visibility into the health of their iPhone's battery, so they can see for themselves if its condition is affecting performance." Apple statement:

"We know that some of you feel Apple has let you down. We apologize. There's been a lot of misunderstanding about this issue, so we would like to clarify and let you know about some changes we're making. First and foremost, we have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades. Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love, and making iPhones last as long as possible is an important part of that."

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Updated 49 mins ago - Politics & Policy

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FBI: Russian hacking group stole data after targeting local governments

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Energetic Bear, a Russian state-sponsored hacking group, has stolen data from two servers after targeting state and federal government networks in the U.S. since at least September, the FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency said on Thursday.

Driving the news: Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced Wednesday that Iran and Russia had obtained voter registration information that could be used to undermine confidence in the U.S. election system.

FDA approves Gilead's remdesivir as a coronavirus treatment

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Why it matters: It's the first and only fully FDA-approved drug in the U.S. for treating the coronavirus.