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Photo: Courtesy Apple.

Apple's AirTags have the potential to be quite handy for those of us who misplace stuff and a significant new revenue source for Apple. But for those who are blind or have very low vision, the new product trackers could be a game changer.

Why it matters: The combination of the iPhones VoiceOver accessibility features and the new product-tracker tags could make it a lot easier for blind people to keep tabs on objects they can't see.

  • "Misplacing items such as your white cane or Braille Display can leave you vulnerable and exposed," says David Goodwin, the founder and editor of AppleVis, a site that specializes in how blind people and those with low vision can benefit from Apple products.
  • "Being able to quickly locate them with a few taps on your iPhone should quite simply be a game changer," Goodwin adds.

How it works:

  • Like Tile, Apple's bluetooth trackers can help locate items using bluetooth and have them play a sound.
  • With AirTags, Apple is incorporating the ability of the latest iPhones to help guide users to the item, offering details like "it's eight feet ahead on your left."
  • And with VoiceOver, a blind person can simply ask Siri to help them find a specific AirTag and get such directions via voice.

Bottom line: Goodwin is eager to get his hands on AirTags, which officially go on sale Friday for $29 a piece or $99 for a four-pack.

  • "Here's to fewer times when I have to ask a family member, friend, work colleague, or nearby stranger 'can you see where I left ...?' ”

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Updated Apr 28, 2021 - Technology

Apple blows past quarterly estimates

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Apple's latest quarterly results greatly exceeded Wall Street expectations, as sales of the iPhone, Mac and iPad all came in far ahead of expectations. The iPhone maker saw total sales outside the U.S. account for more than two-thirds of its nearly $90 billion in quarterly revenue.

Why it matters: Apple is seen as a bellwether for the broader tech industry and is also a huge driver of demand for chips, screens and other components.

3,000 unruly passengers reported to FAA this year

Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Airlines have reported some 3,000 cases of unruly behavior by passengers to the Federal Aviation Administration this year — including 2,300 for refusing to comply with face mask mandates, the FAA announced Monday.

Why it matters: Passenger numbers remain below pre-pandemic levels. But the FAA is investigating the highest number of suspected federal law violations since it began recording unruly passenger incidents in 1995, per ABC News.

House panel to investigate Trump-era DOJ data seizures

Photo: James Devaney via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee will launch a formal probe into the Trump-era Justice Department's seizure of data from devices belonging to members of Congress, their aides, journalists and then-White House counsel, panel chair Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) announced Monday.

Why it matters: Though it's so far unclear if the cases are related, they raise "serious constitutional and separation of power concerns," Nadler said in a statement.