Graphic: Axios

The anonymous "senior Trump administration official" who will release a tell-all book, "A Warning," next month was a frequent participant in meetings with President Trump and plans to recount specific conversations, sources tell me.  

The state of play: The author, who has been silent since last year's mysterious New York Times op-ed, has access to extensive, internal notes that will be revealed in the book, out Nov. 19.

  • "You will hear a great deal from Donald Trump directly, for there is no better witness to his character than his own words," the author writes on the book's back cover, seen for the first time in the graphic above.

Applauding those who are currently coming forward in the Ukraine investigation, the author expects other senior administration officials to come forward soon and share their stories.

  • "Hopefully others will remedy the error of silence and speak out," the author says on the jacket.

The author of the book, which hit #1 on Amazon within 24 hours of its announcement, has agreed to at least one interview with a journalist to coincide with publication, 25 days from now.

  • The format and interviewer haven't been decided.
  • The publisher and agent have been deluged with pitches from national and international media outlets.

No topic will be off limits in the interview, including a direct, firsthand account of what the author calls presidential misconduct.

  • The author, who's being called the original whistleblower of this administration, will explain the decision to remain unknown.

It hasn't been disclosed if the author remains a government employee.

  • The author didn't take an advance, according to the literary agents for the project, Keith Urbahn and Matt Latimer of Javelin.

Go deeper: How "senior" is Anonymous?

Go deeper

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15 states broke single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: Compiled from state health departments by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

At least 15 states broke their single-day novel coronavirus infection records this week, according to state health department data reviewed by Axios.

The big picture: The number of coronavirus cases increased in the vast majority of states over the last week, and decreased in only two states plus the District of Columbia, Axios' Andrew Withershoop and Caitlin Owens report.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 11,143,945 — Total deaths: 527,681 — Total recoveries — 6,004,593Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 2,818,588 — Total deaths: 129,584 — Total recoveries: 883,561 — Total tested: 34,213,497Map.
  3. States: Photos of America's pandemic July 4 ICU beds in Arizona's hot spot reach near capacity.
  4. Public health: U.S. coronavirus infections hit record highs for 3 straight days.
  5. Politics: Trump extends PPP application deadlineKimberly Guilfoyle tests positive.
  6. World: Mexican leaders call for tighter border control as infections rise in U.S.
  7. Sports: 31 MLB players test positive as workouts resume.
  8. 1 📽 thing: Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback.
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In photos: America celebrates July 4 during global pandemic

Photo: Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

The U.S. has already celebrated Easter, graduations and so much more during the coronavirus pandemic, and now it can add July 4 to the list.

The state of play: Axios' Stef Kight writes public parades and fireworks displays around much of the country are being canceled to prevent mass gatherings where the virus could spread. Hot-dog contests and concerts will play to empty stands and virtual audiences — all while American pride treads an all-time low.