Graphic: Axios

The anonymous "senior Trump administration official" who will release a tell-all book, "A Warning," next month was a frequent participant in meetings with President Trump and plans to recount specific conversations, sources tell me.  

The state of play: The author, who has been silent since last year's mysterious New York Times op-ed, has access to extensive, internal notes that will be revealed in the book, out Nov. 19.

  • "You will hear a great deal from Donald Trump directly, for there is no better witness to his character than his own words," the author writes on the book's back cover, seen for the first time in the graphic above.

Applauding those who are currently coming forward in the Ukraine investigation, the author expects other senior administration officials to come forward soon and share their stories.

  • "Hopefully others will remedy the error of silence and speak out," the author says on the jacket.

The author of the book, which hit #1 on Amazon within 24 hours of its announcement, has agreed to at least one interview with a journalist to coincide with publication, 25 days from now.

  • The format and interviewer haven't been decided.
  • The publisher and agent have been deluged with pitches from national and international media outlets.

No topic will be off limits in the interview, including a direct, firsthand account of what the author calls presidential misconduct.

  • The author, who's being called the original whistleblower of this administration, will explain the decision to remain unknown.

It hasn't been disclosed if the author remains a government employee.

  • The author didn't take an advance, according to the literary agents for the project, Keith Urbahn and Matt Latimer of Javelin.

Go deeper: How "senior" is Anonymous?

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
13 mins ago - World

U.S. no longer recognizes Lukashenko as president of Belarus

Lukashenko at his secret inauguration. Photo: Andrei Stasevich/BELTA/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. no longer recognizes Aleksandr Lukashenko as the legitimate president of Belarus, the State Department said in a statement on Wednesday.

Why it matters: Lukashenko has clung to power with the support of Russia amid seven weeks of protests that have followed a blatantly rigged election. Fresh protests broke out Wednesday evening in Minsk after it emerged that Lukashenko had held a secret inauguration ceremony.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 31,735,542 — Total deaths: 973,443 Total recoveries: 21,798,488Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 6,925,840 — Total deaths: 201,617 — Total recoveries: 2,646,959 — Total tests: 96,612,436Map.
  3. Health: CDC director says over 90% of Americans have not yet been exposed to coronavirus — Supply shortages continue to plague testing.
  4. Politics: Poll: 51% of Republicans trust Trump on coronavirus more than the CDC.
  5. Vaccines: Johnson & Johnson begins large phase 3 trial — The FDA plans to toughen standards.
  6. Sports: Less travel is causing the NBA to see better basketball.

Trump says he wants 9 justices in case Supreme Court must decide 2020 election

President Trump told reporters at the White House on Wednesday that part of his urgency to quickly push through a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is that he believes the Supreme Court may have to decide the result of the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump claimed at the Republican National Convention that the only way he will lose the election is if it is "rigged," and he has declined to say whether he would accept the results of November's election if he loses to Joe Biden.

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