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Photo: Jennifer Law/AFP via Getty Images

Anita Hill has a few "ground rules" for senators in the upcoming hearing on Christine Blasey Ford's claims that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were in high school: "''[N]ot getting it' isn’t an option for our elected representatives. In 2018, our senators must get it right," Hill writes in an op-ed published in the New York Times.

Why it matters: Hill writes from her own experience in 1991, when she testified in front of the Senate with accusations of sexual misconduct on the part of then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. She was aggressively questioned about her story, and Justice Thomas was ultimately confirmed. "There is no way to redo 1991, but there are ways to do better," Hill's op-ed begins.

Her advice: "Refrain from pitting the public interest in confronting sexual harassment against the need for a fair confirmation hearing."

  • "Select a neutral investigative body with experience in sexual misconduct."
  • "Do not rush these hearings." Hill said the decision to hold the hearing on Monday was "discouraging" and does not give investigators enough time to thoroughly look into the allegations.
  • "Finally, refer to Christine Blasey Ford by her name."

What they're saying:

Joe Biden, who presided over Anita Hill's hearing, told Teen Vogue Magazine late last year that he owed Hill an apology for the way the hearing went. He said that his "one regret is that I wasn’t able to tone down the attacks on her by some of my Republican friends."

Go deeper

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.