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Google plans to formally launch Android O just after next Monday's solar eclipse. A livestream is scheduled for 2:40 p.m. ET on Aug. 21.

"Android O is touching down to Earth with the total solar eclipse, bringing some super (sweet) new powers," Google said on an eclipse-themed teaser site. The software, which has been in testing for months, aims to improve battery life and add picture-in-picture multitasking on phones.

The creamy middle: Eagle-eyed enthusiasts noted that one of the accompanying files to a Google+ post had Oreo teaser in the file name, so that could well be the dessert-themed name for O.

The bottom line: Of course, what really matters is when the new software starts to show up on phones. Expect existing Google devices like the Pixel to be the first to get the update. As for new devices, the next Pixel will almost certainly be running O. And Samsung is due to debut the next Galaxy Note on Wednesday. It's either going to be one of the last flagship devices running Nougat or one of the first to pack Android O

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Post-debate poll finds Biden strong on every major issue

Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Science

The murder hornets are here

A braver man than me holds a speciment of the Asian giant hornet. Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Entomologists in Washington state on Thursday discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S.

Why it matters: You may know this insect species by its nom de guerre: "the murder hornet." While the threat they pose to humans has been overstated, the invading hornets could decimate local honeybee populations if they establish themselves.