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Andrew Weissmann, one of the lead prosecutors on special counsel Robert Mueller's team and the architect of the case against Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, said there is "definitely new information" in the final volume of the Senate Intelligence Committee's report on 2016 Russian interference released Tuesday.

Why it matters: It underscores the degree to which the 996-page report goes further than the Mueller investigation in some of its findings, as well as the explosive nature of some of the revelations about Manafort and other top Trump campaign officials.

What's new: The bipartisan Senate report describes Manafort's right-hand man Konstantin Kilimnik as a Russian intelligence officer. "That is much further than he was described publicly by the special counsel's office," Weissmann points out.

  • The committee, like Mueller, found that Manafort and his deputy Rick Gates passed sensitive internal campaign data and strategy to Kilimnik, but it could not determine with whom Kilimnik went on to share it or why he shared it.
  • The report also found that there was some evidence to suggest that Kilimnik was involved in the Russian operation to hack and leak Democratic emails — which Weissmann described as "substantial new information." The section detailing that evidence is largely redacted.

Weissmann went on to note that the Senate report assesses that then-candidate Trump spoke with Roger Stone about WikiLeaks' plans to release damaging information about Hillary Clinton on "multiple occasions" — despite Trump's claims in written answers to Mueller that he "did not recall" discussing the topic with Stone.

  • "I'd say the report elegantly tries not to use the phrase 'lie,' but it comes darn close," Weissmann said.
  • "So it leaves it to you to decide, do you really think you would forget that? Given how important that information became to the campaign in terms of it dribbling out throughout October?"

Between the lines: Weissmann addressed criticism circulating on social media on Tuesday that argued that Mueller failed to uncover damaging information about Trump revealed in the Senate's report and thus "enabled" Trump's future behavior.

  • "Our job was not to stop him," Weissmann said. "Our job was to uncover the facts and apply the law to that. But I think that for a variety of reasons you could say there was a failure on the part of the special counsel's office and on the part of Congress in terms of how hard we would dig for information."
  • "And also, I think Congress can rightly be upbraided about what they did with the report once they had it because the facts were, or at least many facts were laid out to them that they could have taken action on."

Go deeper: More findings from the Senate report

Go deeper

Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.

Updated 14 mins ago - World

Trudeau's party projected to win minority government in Canada

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo: Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government was reelected for a third term in the country's parliamentary elections, but without a majority, CBC and CTV News projected early Tuesday.

By the numbers: The Liberal Party needed to win 170 seats in the 338-seat House of Commons to form a majority government. Preliminary figures showed the party had won 156 seats just before 1:30a.m. ET, with over 90% of polling stations reporting.

39 mins ago - World

Reports: CIA director's team member reported Havana Syndrome symptoms

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director Bill Burns during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in April on Capitol Hill. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

A member of CIA director Bill Burns' team who traveled with him to India this month was treated for "symptoms consistent with Havana syndrome," CNN first reported Monday.

Why it matters: Current and former officials told the New York Times the incident signals a "possible escalation" in the mysterious neurological symptoms affecting as many as 200 Americans who've worked in overseas posts since 2016.