Amazon warehouse in Castel San Giovanni, Italy. Photo: Emanuele Cremaschi / Getty

Trump's attacks on Amazon are likely to put the company under added tax scrutiny by foreign governments, according to a report by Wells Fargo.

Why it matters: Ken Sena, a senior analyst with the bank, said Trump's multi-day Twitter rant regarding retail closures and his "perceptions of Amazon tax evasion stand to play well to some foreign and state governments who conceivably share the president’s concerns."

Sena wrote:

  • "As the potential exists for the rhetoric and tweet barrage to intensify, we see the president’s actions as potentially stirring additional scrutiny of Amazon, beyond the Federal government, particularly where tax is concerned."
  • "This is likely true even though many of us remember the Presidential debate where we heard from the President how not paying federal taxes 'makes me smart.'”

The European Union has already had Amazon, as well as the rest of American big tech companies, under its gaze:

  • In October, the EU ordered Amazon to pay $294 million because of an "illegal tax advantage."
  • Last month, the EU said it may charge all the big tech companies a digital tax of 3% on gross revenue in individual countries.

Tesla's potential hit: Brian Johnson, an analyst with Barclay's, says Tesla may become another victim of Trump's most recent tirades, in this case his trade tariffs against China.

  • China has added a 25% levy on top of an already-existing import tariff on foreign cars. Currently, a Tesla Model S 100D costs $148,000 in China, versus $94,000 in the U.S. The new tariff will go on top of that.
  • Last year, Tesla sold 17% of its cars in China. Unlike most other carmakers, Tesla doesn't manufacture any vehicles in China.

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A court fight for the ages

The flag flies at half-staff as people mourn on the Supreme Court steps last night. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Ruth Bader Ginsburg — feminist icon, legal giant, toast of pop culture — left this statement with granddaughter Clara Spera as cancer closed in: "My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed."

The big picture: For all that the nation owes "Notorious RBG" — the hip-hop-inspired nickname she enjoyed and embraced — Republicans are planning to do their best to be sure her robe is quickly filled, despite that last wish, with her ideological polar opposite.

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As the coronavirus pandemic drags into its seventh month, it remains an open debate whether the U.S. should aim for the elimination of COVID-19 — and whether we even can at this point.

Why it matters: This is the question underlying all of the political and medical battles over COVID-19. As both the direct effects of the pandemic and the indirect burden of the response continue to add up, we risk ending up with the worst of both worlds if we fail to commit to a course.