Sen. Amy Klobuchar. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While visiting Iowa on Saturday, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar released a farming-focused plan as part of her 2020 body of policy that includes raising the debt cap on farm bankruptcies and increasing access to federal loan programs.

By the numbers: The presidential hopeful's priorities for farmers include raising the liability cap from $4.2 million to $10 million, giving more farmers flexibility to seek relief, especially during hiccups in the economy.

  • Klobuchar also wants to increase the Department of Agriculture's loan limit from $400,000 to $600,000, and the farm ownership loan limit from $600,000 to $650,000.

The big picture: Low commodity prices, economic uncertainty, lending regulations, climate change and President Trump’s trade war have all posed challenges to family farms throughout the U.S. Since June 2014, bankruptcy filings for farms in the Central U.S. have nearly doubled, coinciding with commodity prices began to drop.

  • The Minnesota Democrat also intends to overhaul small refinery waivers, new compliance standards and added oversight.

Go deeper: Amy Klobuchar on the issues, in under 500 words

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Uber to buy Postmates in $2.65 billion deal

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Uber has agreed to acquire food delivery company Postmates for $2.65 billion in an all-stock deal, the companies announced Monday.

Why it matters: This is the latest merger for the food delivery space as the sector undergoes an ongoing market consolidation.

Analysts expect soaring stock market despite slashed earnings forecasts

Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

Despite cutting expectations for companies' earnings by the most in history and revenue by the most since 2009, Wall Street analysts are getting increasingly bullish on the overall direction of the U.S. stock market.

What's happening: Equity analysts are expecting earnings in the second quarter to fall by 43.8% — the most since 2008's fourth quarter 69.1% decline.

Case growth outpacing testing in coronavirus hotspots

Data: The COVID Tracking Project. Note: Vermont and Hawaii were not included because they have fewer than 20 cases per day. Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't due to increased testing — particularly not where cases have grown fastest over the last month.

Why it matters: The U.S. doesn't yet know what it looks like when a pandemic rages on relatively unchecked after the health system has become overwhelmed. It may be about to find out.