Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Amy Klobuchar said she has "taken a strong position against" the U.S. adopting an English-language amendment, while promoting her plans for immigration reform on Friday in Las Vegas, AP reports.

Why it matters: After campaigning in Iowa and New Hampshire, two predominantly white states, Klobuchar's next electoral test is in Nevada, a state with a critical Hispanic constituency.

  • Klobuchar had a strong showing in New Hampshire, trailing close on the heels of former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Bernie Sanders.
  • But Sanders "has transformed his outreach to Hispanic voters" compared to his 2016 presidential run, by "hiring high-level Latino advisers, beefing up Spanish-speaking canvassing and digging deep into Latino neighborhoods to find voters open to his populist message," the New York Times reports.

Flashback: Klobuchar and 16 other Democrats voted in 2007 in favor of an amendment that would reverse an executive order requiring federal agencies to release materials in other languages besides English, per AP.

What to watch: The next Democratic debate will be held in Las Vegas on Feb. 19.

Go deeper: The first-time Latino voters

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Judge lifts block on Trump book publisher, but upholds order on his niece

President Trump at the White House on June 26. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The injunction on a memoir on President Trump by his niece was lifted on Wednesday by a judge in New York Supreme Court's Appellate Division, Second Department.

Driving the news: The judge ruled that publisher Simon & Schuster did not seem to be bound by the confidentiality agreement signed by the author, Mary Trump, of the book "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man," which was originally due for release on July 28. However, appeals court judge Alan Scheinkman upheld the restraining order against the president's niece.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8 p.m. ET: 10,644,064 — Total deaths: 514,527 — Total recoveries — 5,426,842Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8 p.m. ET: 2,682,270 — Total deaths: 127,970 — Total recoveries: 729,994 — Total tested: 32,740,322Map.
  3. Federal government: Trump says he still thinks coronavirus will "just disappear" at some point, supports another round of direct payments to Americans.
  4. Public health: Thanks to coronavirus, your home is now your gymFormer FDA chief says 500,000 Americans may be contracting coronavirus a day.
  5. States: Georgia and Arizona report record new coronavirus cases — California shuts down bars and indoor dining for most residents.
  6. 1 ⚽️ thing: 6 players test positive for coronavirus before MLS comeback tournament.
Updated 3 hours ago - World

Hong Kong's fate is the future of globalism

Andrew Wan, a pro-democracy legislator, is arrested during a protest in Hong Kong, July 1. Photo: Yat Kai Yeung/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A new security law in Hong Kong is the latest blow to a globalist vision of the free movement of people, ideas and capital.

Why it matters: The law all but eliminates the civil rights that people in Hong Kong have exercised for years. But it also points the way to a more dangerous and divided world that will be increasingly defined by borders and nationality.