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Americans say AI poses greater job threat than immigration

a white robot with a touch screen and a man using the touch screen
Photo: BSIP / UIG via Getty Images

More than half of Americans (58%) believe that artificial intelligence poses a greater threat to U.S. jobs over the next 10 years than immigration and offshoring (42%,) according to a new Northeastern University/Gallup survey.

By the numbers:

  • 61% of the youngest age group polled, 18-35 year olds, believe that technology poses the deepest threat, compared to 39% of pointed to immigration and offshoring.
  • Republicans were the only subgroup to think that immigration and offshoring (48%) pose a bigger threat than AI (52%,) while Democrats chose AI as the higher threat (67%) by 34 more percentage points than immigration and offshoring (33%.)
Amy Harder 3 hours ago
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Climate change goes to business school(s)

Beautiful long entrance to Duke University, with the chapel at the end
Duke University Chapel. Photo: Lance King/Getty Images

More than a dozen business schools and some of Wall Street’s biggest firms are converging for the next two days at Duke University to discuss the business effects of climate change.

Why it matters: This conference is being billed as the first to bring together students from a range of business schools to address the issue. That reflects both how climate change is becoming more of a tangible business concern and that younger people care more about it than older generations.

Steve LeVine 19 hours ago
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The U.S. suburbs are hot again

The talk around the world is about the rise of the city. But in the U.S., suburbanization is accelerating, according to new Census data released today.

Data: Census Bureau, analysis by Jed Kolko at Indeed.com; Chart: Axios Visuals

What's happening: Since about 2011, the growth of the urban counties of large cities has been sliding. Population growth in their higher-density suburbs has been falling since 2015 as well. But, as you see in the chart above, lower-density suburbs had the highest growth among all places, and exurbs and small towns have also been on the rise, according to an analysis of the data by Jed Kolko, chief economist at Indeed.