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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Nearly three quarters of adults say they are spending more on entertainment each month, according to a new survey conducted by Wakefield Research on behalf of Dolby.

Why it matters: American consumers are spending more on entertainment content as they try to binge-watch their way through the pandemic, which coincided with a flood of new streaming service options, including HBO Max, Peacock and Disney+. While consolidation is still expected, for now a rising tide is helping keep most boats afloat. (The S.S. Quibi has already sunk.)

By the numbers:

  • Millennials are spending the most, with their average entertainment spending up an average of 38%.
  • Nearly half of those surveyed said they had upgraded at least one of their streaming services to a premium version in the past six months.
  • Upwards of three-quarters of those surveyed (77%) said the news impacts what they watch, with nearly half saying they use entertainment to escape current events.
  • More than two-thirds of U.S. adults (69%) said they plan to purchase new hardware in the next six months to beef up their home entertainment experience, with 54% specifically mentioning living room gear such as a new TV, soundbar or speakers.

Go deeper

Netflix's staying power

Reproduced from ANTENNA; Chart: Axios Visuals

Netflix has managed to keep its dominant position as one of the least-canceled subscription services in America, according to data from ANTENNA, which tracks purchase behavior and key metrics across subscription media services. The one exception was in September, when it faced brief backlash around a French film called "Cuties."

Driving the news: Data shows that other streamers, like Disney+ and HBO Max, are able to drive sign-ups and buzz with new hits, but the question is whether they can retain users long-term.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.