Nov 11, 2018

Troops deployed to U.S.-Mexico border lack hot food, electricity

A U.S. soldier at a border crossing in Donna, Texas, on Nov. 6. Photo: Andrew Cullen/AFP/Getty Images

The midterms are over. But the 5,600 American troops sent to the southern border with Mexico are "still going through the motions of an elaborate mission that appeared to be set into action by a commander in chief determined to get his supporters to the polls," the New York Times reports.

What's happening: Troops at the border are sleeping in tents that house 20 soldiers and have no electricity or air conditioning, with some suffering heat exhaustion within days of starting the mission. There's no mess hall — only pre-made "Ready-to-Eat" meals — and the only phone chargers available are attached to "a few generators that power spotlights around the living area." Department of Defense officials worry that if the number of troops increases to 15,000, the cost could be as high as $200 million.

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