Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

An Ambulnz vehicle in New York. Photo: Courtesy of Nicole Zhu via Twitter

Ambulnz, a startup that dispatches non-emergency ambulances, has filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission to raise $90 million in outside funding. The company did not respond to multiple attempts for comment.

The bottom line: Ambulnz is seeking a lot of cash, but it's unclear how the company operates.

What they're not saying: The Ambulnz website is sparse on details, and there's no explanation of how it earns money or how it works with health insurers.

  • Several company phone extensions led to busy signals or voicemails. Calls to Ambulnz CFO Andre Oberholzer were not returned. LinkedIn messages to Oberholzer and CEO Stan Vashovsky were not returned. Emails to support@ambulnz.com, which is referenced on the company's terms of service and privacy policy, generated bounceback messages.

What we know: Ambulnz says it offers "non-emergency patient transportation services," such as moving patients between hospitals and nursing homes or getting people to their doctor appointments. Uber and Lyft do this as well.

  • That means Ambulnz isn't providing rides for people who get shot, have heart attacks or encounter other emergencies. Those still require a 911 call.
  • One EMT for Ambulnz explained in a video the company pays based on how many rides they complete — "the more calls you run, the more money you make."

The services are expensive.

  • An Ambulnz representative said its standard rides were $350 plus $10 per mile. If a nurse is needed on board, it goes to $850 plus the mileage. The representative said the company "expects payment upfront," but rates could depend on insurance.
  • Ambulnz's rates are well above the $225 Medicare pays for basic non-emergency ambulance transports. And even higher above what an Uber or Lyft ride would likely cost (remember: this isn't for emergencies).
  • The company's fees are tied to a "local market rate card" and "available upon request." Axios has requested them, but has not received a copy yet.

The big picture: Like other premium health care services, we don't know how big the market and demand for this particular service is, given the high cost, narrow purpose and cheaper alternatives.

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.