Amazon chose Crystal City (left) and Long Island City in New York (right). Photos: Getty Images.

Amazon will split its HQ2 between Virginia’s National Landing and New York’s Long Island City, with construction starting as soon as 2019 for new offices to house the 25,000 high-paid tech jobs each city will get. Nashville was also chosen for a new operations center and slated to receive 5,000 jobs.

Why it matters: Dozens of cities vied for the promise of new jobs, economic stimulus and the cachet of "tech hub." For the winners, the new Amazon headquarters came at a price: New York is giving Amazon $1.5 billion in tax credits and other incentives; Arlington is offering $573 million; and Nashville $102 million per the Washington Post.

Both cities for HQ2 fit the ideal of what Amazon asked for: business-friendly metropolitan areas with plenty of transportation options and room for real estate development.

In Virginia, what Amazon is calling National Landing, real estate firm JGB Smith agreed to give Amazon exclusive rights to lease space in its buildings and to buy its land holdings, according to Seeking Alpha.

  • Amazon will lease about 500,000 square feet of existing space at three different buildings and will purchase Pen Place and Met 6, 7, 8 land in JBG Smith's future development pipeline with estimated potential development density of up to 4.1 million square feet.
  • Locals are already complaining about the name of the newly branded neighborhood, now called "National Landing," per BuzzFeed.

Long Island City's plan will include a helipad. But the city isn't asking the company to help out with New York City's subway reconstruction, per Slate.

  • Amazon will instead fund projects in Queens “including but not limited to streets, sidewalks, utility relocations, environmental remediation, public open space, transportation, schools and signage.”
  • Citi is moving more than a third of its 3,000 employees from One Court Square in Long Island City to make room for Amazon, reports Seeking Alpha. Amazon will lease about 1 million square feet of office space in One Court Square.

The bottom line: Finalists that offered big incentive packages like Toronto, Maryland and New Jersey may have dodged a bullet. Since the announcement, public officials have been airing their grievances on the negative effects the e-commerce behemoth would have moving into their neighborhoods.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 11 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 19,778,566— Total deaths: 729,768 — Total recoveries — 12,044,654Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 5,044,69 — Total deaths: 162,938 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on unemployment — Mnuchin says Trump executive orders were cleared by Justice Department.
  4. States: New York reports lowest rate of positive coronavirus test results since pandemic began
  5. Public health: Ex-FDA head: U.S. will "definitely" see 200,000 to 300,000 virus deaths by end of 2020. 
  6. Schools: Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral — How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on.
Updated 30 mins ago - World

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested under national security law

Media tycoon Jimmy Lai at the Next Digital offices in Hong Kong in June. Photo: Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Jimmy Lai has been arrested for "collusion with foreign powers," said Mark Simon, an executive at the tycoon's media firm Next Digital Monday morning local time.

Why it matters: He was arrested under the new national security law that gives Beijing more powers over the former British colony. Lai is the most prominent person arrested under the law, which prompted the U.S. to sanction Chinese officials, including Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, over Beijing's efforts to strip the territory of its autonomy.

New York reports new low positive coronavirus test rate

People physically distancing at tables in New York City's Times Square in June. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced Sunday 515 people, or 0.78% of those tested, returned a positive reading for COVID-19 the previous day.

Why it matters: It's the lowest single-day positive rate since the start of the pandemic. It's another sign that the state that was once a global coronavirus epicenter is curbing the spread of the virus. "Our daily numbers remain low and steady, despite increasing infection rates across the country, and even in our region," Cuomo said in a statement. "But we must not become complacent: Everyone should continue to wear their masks and socially distance."

Go deeper: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning