Apr 24, 2020 - Economy & Business

Amazon workers plan sickout over working conditions amid coronavirus pandemic

Ina Fried, author of Login

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Some warehouse workers at Amazon are expected to call in sick Friday as a protest against what they say are inadequate protections for employees and retribution from the company against those who speak out.

Why it matters: Amazon has become a critical source of goods amid a pandemic that has shut down much of traditional retail. However, critics say the company has not done enough to prevent the spread of coronavirus among warehouse workers.

  • An online protest is planned for 9am PT, including talks from two fired workers as well as other employees and outside experts discussing warehouse conditions.
  • Amazon confirmed a significant COVID-19 outbreak at a New Jersey warehouse, with Business Insider reporting that more than 30 workers have been infected.

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Updated 10 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.

6 million white-collar jobs could be at risk in second wave of coronavirus layoffs

Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Close to 6 million jobs are at risk of being lost in coming months as a second wave of coronavirus-induced layoffs is headed for the U.S., according to a new report from Bloomberg Economics.

What's happening: The job cuts are expected to include higher-paid supervisors in sectors where frontline workers have been hit first, such as restaurants and hotels. It also includes the knock-on effects to connected industries such as professional services, finance and real estate.

The policies that could help fix policing

 Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

George Floyd's death has reignited the long and frustrating push to reform a law enforcement system whose systemic flaws have been visible for years.

Why it matters: Solving these problems will require deep political, structural and cultural changes, experts and advocates say — but they also point to a handful of specific policy changes that, while not a cure, would make a difference.