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Photo: Lisa Werner / Contributor / Getty Images

Amazon is expanding its physical offices in six U.S. cities, adding 3,500 corporate jobs in New York, Phoenix, San Diego, Denver, Detroit and Dallas, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: The tech giant is "making long-term plans around office work even as other companies embrace lasting remote employment." Amazon is currently allowing employees who can work remotely to do so until Jan. 8, 2021.

  • Amazon says the new builds aren't being motivated by any financial incentives from state or local governments.
  • The full expansion is set to take two years.

The other side: Major companies, including Facebook and Twitter, have begun shifts towards permanent remote work.

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Nov 24, 2020 - Economy & Business

$10,000 to telework from Tulsa

Tulsa, Oklahoma, at sunrise. Photo: Jumping Rocks/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

If you're going to be working remotely for the foreseeable future and want to save some money on rent, you could move to Tulsa — and get paid $10,000 to do so.

Why it matters: Tulsa Remote — the Kaiser Family Foundation-funded program that's offering this perk to teleworkers — is a prime example of smaller cities attempting to leverage remote work to draw in talented professionals from the big, coastal metros.

2 hours ago - World

Map: A look at world population density in 3D

This fascinating map is made by Alasdair Rae of Sheffield, England, a former professor of urban studies who is the founder of Automatic Knowledge. It shows world population density in 3D.

Details: "No land is shown on the map, only the locations where people actually live. ... The higher the spike, the more people live in an area. Where there are no spikes, there are no people (e.g. you can clearly identify ... the Sahara Desert)."

Biden's Day 1 challenges: The immigration reset

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President-elect Biden has an aggressive Day One immigration agenda that relies heavily on executive actions to undo President Trump's crackdown.

Why it matters: It's not that easy. Trump issued more than 400 executive actions on immigration. Advocates are fired up. The Supreme Court could threaten the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and experts warn there could be another surge at the border.