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A view of Crystal City, the Arlington, Virgina, neighborhood where Amazon has chosen to base its second North American headquarters. Photo: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images.

Capitalizing on the area's success in luring Amazon's second headquarters, 10 counties and cities from Northern Virginia are joining forces to strengthen their collective regional brand.

Why it matters: Getting separate jurisdictions to work together on economic development efforts is a familiar challenge for large metro areas that encompass multiple cities, counties or even states that often end up competing against each other.

Background: In its request for HQ2 proposals, Amazon encouraged regional responses. Four counties (Loudon, Fairfax, Arlington and Alexandria) came together to submit a proposal under the Northern Virginia moniker.

  • The goal of the Northern Virginia Economic Development Alliance (NOVA EDA), which was announced Monday, is to build on the region's success in winning HQ2 and build a brand and identity around innovation to attract even more jobs and growth in the future. The close proximity to policymakers doesn't hurt, either.
  • "While we are all very invested in promoting our own communities, there's a lot of power to collectively brand the region as a place for business," said Buddy Rizer, Executive Director of Economic Development for Loudoun County.

Details: Northern Virginia was first put on the map in telecom and tech in the 90s, when companies like AOL, Nextel and MCI got national attention. Since then, industries like cybersecurity and data centers have grown.

  • But the group was careful not to pigeon-hole the area into any single vertical, and chose to focus on innovation more broadly, said Stephanie Landrum, CEO of the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership.
  • Members of the alliance: Arlington County, City of Fairfax, Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, City of Falls Church, Fauquier County, Loudoun County, City of Manassas, City of Manassas Park, and Prince William County. 

What's next: Working more closely with Maryland and D.C. officials on shared issues such as transportation and affordable housing is the aspiration. "The workforce is not a jurisdictional issue; it's a regional issue," Rizer said.

Go deeper: Amazon's HQ2 could drain D.C.'s tech talent

Go deeper

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.

Off the Rails

Episode 5: The secret CIA plan

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer, Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 5: Trump vs. Gina — The president becomes increasingly rash and devises a plan to tamper with the nation's intelligence command.

In his final weeks in office, after losing the election to Joe Biden, President Donald Trump embarked on a vengeful exit strategy that included a hasty and ill-thought-out plan to jam up CIA Director Gina Haspel by firing her top deputy and replacing him with a protege of Republican Congressman Devin Nunes.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Empire State Building among hundreds to light up in Biden inauguration coronavirus tribute.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.