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Amazon's new dashboard lets parents remotely see what their kids are up to. Screenshot: Amazon.com

Amazon, which already has some of the most parent-friendly options for its Fire tablets, added some more improvements on Thursday.

Why it matters: The moves come as Apple and Google are expected to invest more in this area.

Specifically, Amazon is improving its Web-based parent dashboard that provides insights on what your children are doing on their devices. With the update, parents will now be able to remotely change the parental controls on a kids' device.

The company also recently added discussion cards that provide possible conversation points related to the apps, books and videos kids are using.

Survey says: The company points to a recent survey of a thousand parents that found 72% want kids to have their own tablet or smartphones and three quarters don't want to hover. At the same time, parents want to know what their kids are up to and to set limits.

"We do view our role as helping parents really accomplish these goals," Amazon general manager Kurt Beidler told Axios. Beidler said Amazon's products aim to "create spaces where your kids can explore and learn independently."

The backstory: Amazon already lets parents set time limits for different types of content, whitelist specific apps or videos and create kids-only environments on a shared phone or tablet.

Apple, in particular, lacks such features while Google's Android relies on third party tools for such features. Earlier this year Apple added a new families page to its Web site and promised new features were coming, but declined to offer specifics. Axios also reported that additional parental controls would be coming as part of the next version of iOS even as other features get cut.

Clarification: An earlier versions of this story incorrectly said that the parent dashboard as a whole was new. What's new is the ability to remotely control settings.

Go deeper

3 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

5 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving.
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions.
  3. World: Expert says COVID vaccine likely won't be available in Africa until Q2 of 2021 — Europeans extend lockdowns.
  4. Economy: The winners and losers of the COVID holiday season.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.