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Dave Limp, senior vice president of Amazon devices, announces new Alexa products and services. Photo: Grant Hindsley/AFP/Getty Images.

You may have already heard that Amazon Alexa can now be a part of every aspect of your life — including a wall clock. But here are some other stories from the week to catch up on.

Catch up quick: Amazon announced a flood of new Alexa-powered appliances; Lime and Bird pass the 10 million ride mark; Instagram's IGTV algorithm recommended videos of disturbing and graphic content; Facebook is pulling back site support for Donald Trump's 2020 campaign; and Google staff discussed search-related tweaks after 2017 travel ban.

Amazon announced a flood of new Alexa-powered home and car appliances

Why it matters: Journalists soaked up the 80 minutes an Amazon executive gave to announce voice-assistant powered products from microwaves to Alexa in cars. But, Recode's Jason Del Ray writes how amidst the buzz there were no attempts to reassure consumers the potential privacy policy risks that come with the new omniscient Alexa.

Lime and Bird pass the 10 million ride mark

Why it matters: Scooter rentals are seen as the "new ride-hailing" by investors and users alike. At least for now, it looks like Bird and Lime are neck and neck in the race.

Instagram's IGTV algorithm recommended videos of disturbing and graphic content

Why it matters: During a three-week Business Insider investigation, potentially illegal videos of child exploitation and genital mutilation — some with over 1 million views —took five days to be removed. Tech giants like Facebook have been criticized for its inconsistent content moderation. For IGTV, however, the complication isn't only that the material is available to users, but that the algorithm is actively suggesting it.

Unlike in 2016, Facebook is pulling back site support for Donald Trump's 2020 campaign

Why it matters: Facebook was scrutinized by Congress for offering the Trump campaign site support, though Hillary Clinton's campaign was offered the same deal but turned it down. This time around, Facebook is taking a backseat as officials work to improve the company’s political advertising website to give free advice to campaigns more broadly.

Google staff discussed search-related tweaks after 2017 travel ban

Why it matters: "These emails were just a brainstorm of ideas, none of which were ever implemented," according to a Google spokesperson. But the leak will pour gasoline on unproven charges that the company builds anti-conservative bias into its products — right before the Justice Department convenes state attorneys general to talk about the issue. An earlier leak showed Google executives' frustration after the 2016 election.

Worthy of your time: Axios staff compiled this week's deep dive on everything you need to know about 5G. Check it out here.

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Go deeper

Congress plots COVID pandemic-era office upgrades

oving crates outside Rep. Elise Stefanik's old office Tuesday. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The House plans to renovate members' suites even though staff are worried about an influx of contractors and D.C. is tightening restrictions on large gatherings, some staffers told Axios.

Why it matters: The Capitol has been closed to public tours since March. Work over the holiday season comes as U.S. coronavirus cases spike, Americans beg for more pandemic assistance and food lines grow.

Trump pressures Barr to release so-called Durham report

Bill Barr. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump and his allies are piling extreme pressure on Attorney General Bill Barr to release a report that Trump believes could hurt perceived Obama-era enemies — and view Barr's designation of John Durham as special counsel as a stall tactic, sources familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

Why it matters: Speculation over Barr's fate grew on Tuesday, with just 49 days remaining in Trump's presidency, after Barr gave an interview to the Associated Press in which he said the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread fraud that could change the election's outcome.

CDC to cut guidance on quarantine period for coronavirus exposure

A health care worker oversees cars as people arrive to get tested for coronavirus at a testing site in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC will soon shorten its guidance for quarantine periods following exposure to COVID-19, AP reported Tuesday and Axios can confirm.

Why it matters: Quarantine helps prevent the spread of the coronavirus, which can occur before a person knows they're sick or if they're infected without feeling any symptoms. The current recommended period to stay home if exposed to the virus is 14 days. The CDC plans to amend this to 10 days or seven with a negative test, an official told Axios.

  • The CDC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.