Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says donors should give directly to swing candidates. Photo: Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) urged small donors Saturday to pause Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee donations, as she became the latest Democrat to criticize a new DCCC policy blacklisting anyone working with primary challengers over sitting Democrats.

The big picture: The new DCCC policy requires vendors to sign a form outlining the committee's "core mission" of electing House Democrats, including "supporting and protecting incumbents."

[T]he DCCC will not conduct business with, nor recommend to any of its targeted campaigns, any consultant that works with an opponent of a sitting Member of the House Democratic Caucus.
— DCCC form

What they're saying: Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), Congressional Progressive Caucus vice chair, told The Intercept this week the policy was "tone-deaf." He said he and Reps. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) and Mark Pocan (D-Wis.) had met with DNCCC chair Cheri Bustos to make clear their opposition to the form.

  • Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.), a fellow Democratic freshman who beat an incumbent Democrat, said in a tweet Saturday the policy risked undermining women and people of color.
Our diversity is our strength. When a candidate takes the risk to run, Democrats should not be in the practice of creating litmus tests or roadblocks that have a chilling effect on new candidates or those who would invest their sweat equity in support.
— Ayanna Pressley

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Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.

Facebook goes after Apple

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is seeking to force a face-off with Apple over its 30% in-app purchase commission fee, which Facebook suggests hurts small businesses struggling to get by during the pandemic.

The big picture: Facebook has never publicly gone after Apple, a key strategic partner, this aggressively. Both companies face antitrust scrutiny, which in Apple's case has centered on the very fee structure Facebook is now attacking.