Feb 7, 2020 - World

White House confirms operation that killed al-Qaeda leader Qassim al-Rimi

President Trump. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The White House confirmed in a statement on Thursday that an operation in Yemen killed Qassim al-Rimi, co-founder and leader of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.

Why it matters: Reports of Rimi's death via an airstrike circulated last weekend, but President Trump did not directly confirm the event. Al-Rimi had been a U.S. target for years, per the Washington Post, and was a deputy to standing al-Qaeda chief Ayman al-Zawahiri.

  • Rimi also claimed responsibility for the 2019 shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola, wherein three American soldiers were killed, AP reports.

What they're saying: "Under Rimi, AQAP committed unconscionable violence against civilians in Yemen and sought to conduct and inspire numerous attacks against the United States and our forces," per the White House statement.

  • "His death further degrades AQAP and the global al-Qa'ida movement, and it brings us closer to eliminating the threats these groups pose to our national security. The United States, our interests, and out allies are safer as a result of his death."

Go deeper: Trump's foreign policy of unwelcome surprises

Go deeper

Donald Trump, the luckiest man

President Trump at a New Hampshire rally on Monday. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump is capitalizing on three years of political, economic and global trends that have exceeded forecasts. He has also benefited from a run of extraordinary good luck.

Why it matters: Trump’s top advisers privately marvel at how he flirts with disaster only to catch a big break, whether it's the Iranians botching their response to his military attack or Democrats embarrassing themselves in Iowa on impeachment eve.

Sudan agrees to turn over officials wanted by ICC for war crimes

Sudan's deposed ruler Omar al-Bashir. Photo: Ebrahim Hamid/AFP via Getty Images

A top Sudanese official said Tuesday that the country's transitional leaders and rebel groups from the Darfur region reached an agreement to hand over officials wanted by the International Criminal Court for prosecution for war crimes, AP reports.

Why it matters: Though he was not specifically mentioned by name, those officials presumably include Sudan's deposed leader Omar al-Bashir, who was the the first person to be charged with genocide by the international body.

Go deeperArrowFeb 11, 2020 - World

Sudan seeks to change its global image

Celebrations in Khartoum last December marking the one-year anniversary of the uprising. Photo: Ashraf Shazly/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan's transitional government has reached an agreement to compensate the families of victims of the 2000 U.S.S. Cole attack, which killed 17 sailors and injured 39, it said Thursday.

Why it matters: This is part of an effort to get off the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. Sudan previously harbored al-Qaeda, which carried out the attack. The designation carries restrictions on foreign assistance and financial transactions that have strangled Sudan's economy.

Go deeperArrowFeb 13, 2020 - World