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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks at a 2017 event dedicated to the seventh anniversary of the Affordable Care Act. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Democratic House committee chairs have written new letters to White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Attorney General Bill Barr demanding information on the administration's decisions about the latest Affordable Care Act lawsuit.

Why it matters: The Department of Justice last year announced that it would no longer defend the ACA against a lawsuit brought by GOP attorneys general alleging that the 2017 tax law made the health care law unconstitutional.

Context: The administration recently laid out its argument for why the entire ACA should fall, a position it signaled in March.

  • House Democrats first wrote to the administration officials in April asking for documents related to its decision. Neither the White House or the DOJ complied, and the new letters reiterate the request.

The bottom line: Their goal is to understand how the decision was made, "including whether the President or anyone in the White House instructed the [DOJ] to override its legal conclusions."

  • The chairmen are also asking that Russ Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, be made available for an interview. They write that they're concerned that "politically-motivated forces inside the White House and the Office of Management and Budget" drove the decision.

Where it stands: The chairs set a deadline of May 27. "If we do not receive a response by this date, we will have no choice but to consider alternative means of obtaining compliance," they write.

Go deeper: Inside the Trump administration's case for killing the ACA

Go deeper

Biden to sign 15 executive actions on Day One

President-elect Joe Biden. Photo: SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is expected to sign 15 executive actions upon taking office Wednesday, immediately reversing key Trump administration policies.

Why it matters: The 15 actions — aimed at issues like climate change and immigration — mark more drastic immediate steps compared with the two day-one actions from Biden's four predecessors combined, according to incoming White House press secretary Jen Psaki.

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.