House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said on ABC's "This Week" that President Trump's stonewalling of congressional oversight — which he considers further obstruction of justice — adds weight to some Democrats' calls for impeachment, but that it may simply be Trump's "perverse way" of dividing the country further.

"Yes, it's certainly true that these additional acts of obstruction — the president having obstructed the Justice Department investigation, now obstructing Congress — does add weight to impeachment. But part of our reluctance is we are already a bitterly divided country and an impeachment process will divide us further. Once we get started, it's like pushing a boulder off the side of a cliff. It gathers a certain momentum of its own until it hits rock bottom, which is the Senate, and then we're like Sisyphus trying to push that boulder back up the hill.
He may get us there. He certainly seems to be trying, and maybe this is his perverse way of dividing us more. And as you heard in the clip earlier, he thinks that's to his political advantage, but it's certainly not to the country's advantage."

The big picture: Schiff — who along with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democratic leaders have cautioned against impeachment — noted that he has always said that Congress should wait to see special counsel Robert Mueller's findings before making any decisions. He said that it is now a priority to get Mueller to testify before Congress, since Attorney General Bill Barr has proven to be an unreliable narrator, and that he is convinced that it will happen — despite negotiations for Mueller to appear on May 15 falling through.

Go deeper: Trump may face impeachment whether or not he cooperates

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Transcripts show George Floyd told police "I can't breathe" over 20 times

Photo: Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Newly released transcripts of bodycam footage from the Minneapolis Police Department show that George Floyd told officers he could not breathe more than 20 times in the moments leading up to his death.

Why it matters: Floyd's killing sparked a national wave of Black Lives Matter protests and an ongoing reckoning over systemic racism in the United States. The transcripts "offer one the most thorough and dramatic accounts" before Floyd's death, The New York Times writes.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 11,921,616 — Total deaths: 546,318 — Total recoveries — 6,506,408Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 3,035,231 — Total deaths: 132,042 — Total recoveries: 936,476 — Total tested: 36,878,106Map.
  3. Public health: Deaths are rising in hotspots — Déjà vu sets in as testing issues rise and PPE dwindles.
  4. Travel: United warns employees it may furlough 45% of U.S. workforce How the pandemic changed mobility habits, by state.
  5. Education: New York City schools will not fully reopen in fallHarvard and MIT sue Trump administration over rule barring foreign students from online classes.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: A misinformation "infodemic" is here.
2 hours ago - Health

Fighting the coronavirus infodemic

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

An "infodemic" of misinformation and disinformation has helped cripple the response to the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: High-powered social media accelerates the spread of lies and political polarization that motivates people to believe them. Unless the public health sphere can effectively counter misinformation, not even an effective vaccine may be enough to end the pandemic.