AP

America's top drug enforcement officer, acting chief of the Drug Enforcement Administration Chuck Rosenberg, shot down President Trump's remarks about police use of force in a worldwide memo to DEA agents Saturday, stating that they should disregard any suggestion that roughing up suspects is okay, per the WSJ.

  • Rosenberg's memo says that Trump "condoned police misconduct" by telling a crowd of law enforcement officials Friday that they shouldn't be "too nice" when arresting "thugs," and that the president's comments required a response.
  • The memo continues: "I write to offer a strong reaffirmation of the operating principles to which we, as law enforcement professionals, adhere... I write because we have an obligation to speak out when something is wrong. That's what law enforcement officers do. That's what you do. We fix stuff. At least, we try."

Rosenberg's background: A longtime Justice Department official, Rosenberg perviously served George W. Bush's first attorney general, John Ashcroft. He also worked for the now-Special Prosecutor in the Russia probe, Robert Mueller, when he was FBI director; and ex-FBI Director James Comey, first when he was deputy AG and again when he became FBI director.

Then in 2015, Attorney General Loretta Lynch hired Rosenberg as acting administrator of the DEA under Barack Obama, and he was kept on by the Trump administration.

Our thought bubble: The move on Rosenberg's part draws parallels to when Sally Yates, then acting attorney general retained by the Trump administration, said she'd refuse to defend Trump's travel ban. Trump asked for her resignation.

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Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

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Bob Woodward's new book details letters between Trump and Kim Jong-un

Bob Woodward during a 2019 event in Los Angele. Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images

Journalist Bob Woodward has obtained "25 personal letters exchanged" between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for his new book, "Rage," publisher Simon & Schuster revealed on Wednesday.

Details: In the letters, "Kim describes the bond between the two leaders as out of a 'fantasy film,' as the two leaders engage in an extraordinary diplomatic minuet," according to a description of the book posted on Amazon.

Dozens of Confederate symbols removed in wake of George Floyd's death

A statue of Confederate States President Jefferson Davis lies on the street after protesters pulled it down in Richmond, Virginia, in June. Photo: Parker Michels-Boyce/AFP via Getty Images

59 Confederate symbols have been removed, relocated or renamed since anti-racism protests began over George Floyd's death, a new Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) report finds.

Why it matters: That's a marked increase on previous years, per the report, which points out just 16 Confederate monuments were affected in 2019.