Aug 1, 2017

Acting DEA chief: Trump "condoned police misconduct"

AP

America's top drug enforcement officer, acting chief of the Drug Enforcement Administration Chuck Rosenberg, shot down President Trump's remarks about police use of force in a worldwide memo to DEA agents Saturday, stating that they should disregard any suggestion that roughing up suspects is okay, per the WSJ.

  • Rosenberg's memo says that Trump "condoned police misconduct" by telling a crowd of law enforcement officials Friday that they shouldn't be "too nice" when arresting "thugs," and that the president's comments required a response.
  • The memo continues: "I write to offer a strong reaffirmation of the operating principles to which we, as law enforcement professionals, adhere... I write because we have an obligation to speak out when something is wrong. That's what law enforcement officers do. That's what you do. We fix stuff. At least, we try."

Rosenberg's background: A longtime Justice Department official, Rosenberg perviously served George W. Bush's first attorney general, John Ashcroft. He also worked for the now-Special Prosecutor in the Russia probe, Robert Mueller, when he was FBI director; and ex-FBI Director James Comey, first when he was deputy AG and again when he became FBI director.

Then in 2015, Attorney General Loretta Lynch hired Rosenberg as acting administrator of the DEA under Barack Obama, and he was kept on by the Trump administration.

Our thought bubble: The move on Rosenberg's part draws parallels to when Sally Yates, then acting attorney general retained by the Trump administration, said she'd refuse to defend Trump's travel ban. Trump asked for her resignation.

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Coronavirus kills 2 Diamond Princess passengers and South Korea sees first death

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. U.S. numbers include Americans extracted from Princess Cruise ship.

Two elderly Diamond Princess passengers have been killed by the novel coronavirus — the first deaths confirmed among the more than 600 infected aboard the cruise ship. South Korea also announced its first death Thursday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed more than 2,200 people and infected over 75,465 others, mostly in mainland China, where the National Health Commission announced 118 new deaths since Thursday.

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SoftBank to cut its stake to get T-Mobile's Sprint deal done

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

T-Mobile and Sprint announced a revised merger agreement that will see SoftBank getting a smaller share of the combined company, while most shareholders will receive the previously agreed upon exchange rate. The companies said they hope to get the deal as early as April 1.

Why it matters: The amended deal reflects the decline in Sprint's business, while leaving most shareholders' stake intact and removing another hurdle to the deal's closure.