Oct 4, 2019

Hundreds of accused priests get no oversight

Photo: AP

There has been "little to no oversight from religious authorities or law enforcement" over the nearly 1,700 priests and clergy members credibly accused of child sexual abuse by the Roman Catholic Church, according to an AP investigation.

Why it matters: Since leaving the church, "dozens have committed crimes, including sexual assault and possessing child pornography," per AP.

  • The priests, deacons, monks and lay people have taught in schools, counsel sexual assault survivors, volunteer at nonprofits helping at-risk kids and foster children, notes AP.

The big picture: Many of the accused priests and clergy members were never formally charged and lived as private citizens after leaving the church. Deciding if a priest is credibly accused is often an internal matter since individual dioceses set their own standards, per AP.

  • Roman Catholic dioceses around the U.S. want to "publish the names of those it considers to be credibly accused." That opens "a window into the daunting problem of how to monitor and track priests," writes AP.
  • The names of more than 5,100 clergy members have already been shared.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: Protesters were still out en masse even as curfews set in Washington, D.C., and New York City. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) slammed the New York Police Department late Tuesday following reports of police kettling in protesters on Manhattan Bridge.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.