SaveSave story

A timeline of Trump’s weekend Twitter spree

Trump addressed the nation on Thursday. Photo: Samuel Corum / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

President Trump has taken to Twitter repeatedly over the past few days, hitting on the two issues driving the news: the deadly school shooting in Florida and the indictments issued by Robert Mueller over Russian interference in the election.

The trend: Trump is in Florida, and spent some of the weekend speaking with local officials and first responders about the Parkland shooting. On Twitter, though, his main focus has been Russia.


  • A federal grand jury brought charges against 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities for violating criminal laws to interfere with the 2016 U.S. election. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said that the indictment does not prove the meddling changed the outcome of the presidential election.
  • The president and first lady visited Broward County, Florida, where 17 students and teachers were killed in a school shooting on Wednesday. He met victims injured in the tragedy and Florida Gov. Rick Scott.
  • That morning...


  • The only item on Trump's public schedule was a series of calls to local officials about the school shooting in Parkland.
  • There was a theme to his tweets: He is being vindicated by the latest Mueller indictments, and the media doesn't want to admit it.
  • And one about Democrats:
  • After it was revealed this week that the FBI failed to follow through on a tip about Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz in January, President Trump tied that failure to the Russia probe in a late night tweet:
  • And then he tweeted once more about the Russia probe, this time going after his national security adviser Gen. H.R. McMaster's statement that the latest Russia probe indictments are proof that meddling took place in 2016:


  • Before 9am on Sunday, the president sent six more tweets about the Russia probe:
  • He singled out out Rep. Adam Schiff — the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee — as a "leakin' monster," but then thanked him in the same tweet for saying the Obama administration should have set up a "more forceful deterrent" to cyberattacks after the 2014 Sony Hack.
  • Then the president said the Russians "have succeeded beyond their wildest dreams" and "are laughing their asses off in Moscow."
  • Finally, Trump went after a frequent Twitter target, CNN, retweeting a cartoon of anchor Wolf Blitzer
SaveSave story

Zuckerberg admits Facebook "breach of trust"

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks wearing a t-shirt, with trees behind him
Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg weighed in on what he called the "Cambridge Analytica situation" today in a Facebook post, saying there was a "a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that."

"We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can't then we don't deserve to serve you. I've been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn't happen again. The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there's more to do, and we need to step up and do it."

Why it matters: Facebook has been under extraordinary pressure from lawmakers, regulators and Wall Street to respond to the issue.

Jonathan Swan 6 hours ago
SaveSave story

Trump to announce anti-China tariffs tomorrow

President Donald Trump
Photo: Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

President Trump plans to unveil his aggressive package of tariffs against China tomorrow, with a charge led by U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer that will use Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 to target Beijing.

The big picture: Two sources with direct knowledge tell me Kevin Hassett has been crunching the numbers, and the dollar value of the tariffs will likely be around $50 billion per year — or slightly less. The administration has used an algorithm to select a batch of Chinese products and then apply tariff rates to those products in a way that will hopefully limit the harm to American consumers.